One- and two-year change in body composition as measured by DXA in a population-based cohort of older men and women

Marjolein Visser, Marco Pahor, Frances Tylavsky, Stephen B. Kritchevsky, Jane A. Cauley, Anne B. Newman, Barbara A. Blunt, Tamara B. Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

136 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Changing body composition has been suggested as a pathway to explain age-related functional decline. No data are available on the expected changes in body composition as measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in a population-based cohort of older persons. Body composition data at baseline, 1-yr follow-up, and 2-yr follow-up was measured by DXA in 2,040 well-functioning black and white men and women aged 70-79 yr, participants of the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study. After 2 yr, a small decline in total body mass was observed (men: -0.3%, women: -0.4%). Among men, fat-free mass and appendicular lean soft tissue mass (ALST) decreased by -1.1 and -0.8%, respectively, which was masked by a simultaneous increase in total fat mass (+2.0%). Among women, a decline in fat-free mass was observed after 2 yr only (-0.6%) with no change in ALST and body fat mass. After 2 yr, the decline in ALST was greater in blacks than whites. Change in total body mass was associated with change in ALST (r = +0.58 to +0.70; P < 0.0001). Among participants who lost total body mass, men lost relatively more ALST than women, and blacks lost relatively more ALST than whites. In conclusion, the mean change in body composition after a 1- to 2-yr follow-up was 1-2% with a high interindividual variability. Loss of ALST was greater in men compared with women, and greater in blacks compared with whites, suggesting that men and blacks may be more prone to muscle loss.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2368-2374
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of applied physiology
Volume94
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2003

Fingerprint

Photon Absorptiometry
Body Composition
Population
Fats
Adipose Tissue
Muscles
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

One- and two-year change in body composition as measured by DXA in a population-based cohort of older men and women. / Visser, Marjolein; Pahor, Marco; Tylavsky, Frances; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Cauley, Jane A.; Newman, Anne B.; Blunt, Barbara A.; Harris, Tamara B.

In: Journal of applied physiology, Vol. 94, No. 6, 01.06.2003, p. 2368-2374.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Visser, Marjolein ; Pahor, Marco ; Tylavsky, Frances ; Kritchevsky, Stephen B. ; Cauley, Jane A. ; Newman, Anne B. ; Blunt, Barbara A. ; Harris, Tamara B. / One- and two-year change in body composition as measured by DXA in a population-based cohort of older men and women. In: Journal of applied physiology. 2003 ; Vol. 94, No. 6. pp. 2368-2374.
@article{80a735e2f89b4382925b1db3266ef8ff,
title = "One- and two-year change in body composition as measured by DXA in a population-based cohort of older men and women",
abstract = "Changing body composition has been suggested as a pathway to explain age-related functional decline. No data are available on the expected changes in body composition as measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in a population-based cohort of older persons. Body composition data at baseline, 1-yr follow-up, and 2-yr follow-up was measured by DXA in 2,040 well-functioning black and white men and women aged 70-79 yr, participants of the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study. After 2 yr, a small decline in total body mass was observed (men: -0.3{\%}, women: -0.4{\%}). Among men, fat-free mass and appendicular lean soft tissue mass (ALST) decreased by -1.1 and -0.8{\%}, respectively, which was masked by a simultaneous increase in total fat mass (+2.0{\%}). Among women, a decline in fat-free mass was observed after 2 yr only (-0.6{\%}) with no change in ALST and body fat mass. After 2 yr, the decline in ALST was greater in blacks than whites. Change in total body mass was associated with change in ALST (r = +0.58 to +0.70; P < 0.0001). Among participants who lost total body mass, men lost relatively more ALST than women, and blacks lost relatively more ALST than whites. In conclusion, the mean change in body composition after a 1- to 2-yr follow-up was 1-2{\%} with a high interindividual variability. Loss of ALST was greater in men compared with women, and greater in blacks compared with whites, suggesting that men and blacks may be more prone to muscle loss.",
author = "Marjolein Visser and Marco Pahor and Frances Tylavsky and Kritchevsky, {Stephen B.} and Cauley, {Jane A.} and Newman, {Anne B.} and Blunt, {Barbara A.} and Harris, {Tamara B.}",
year = "2003",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1152/japplphysiol.00124.2002",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "94",
pages = "2368--2374",
journal = "Journal of Applied Physiology",
issn = "8750-7587",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - One- and two-year change in body composition as measured by DXA in a population-based cohort of older men and women

AU - Visser, Marjolein

AU - Pahor, Marco

AU - Tylavsky, Frances

AU - Kritchevsky, Stephen B.

AU - Cauley, Jane A.

AU - Newman, Anne B.

AU - Blunt, Barbara A.

AU - Harris, Tamara B.

PY - 2003/6/1

Y1 - 2003/6/1

N2 - Changing body composition has been suggested as a pathway to explain age-related functional decline. No data are available on the expected changes in body composition as measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in a population-based cohort of older persons. Body composition data at baseline, 1-yr follow-up, and 2-yr follow-up was measured by DXA in 2,040 well-functioning black and white men and women aged 70-79 yr, participants of the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study. After 2 yr, a small decline in total body mass was observed (men: -0.3%, women: -0.4%). Among men, fat-free mass and appendicular lean soft tissue mass (ALST) decreased by -1.1 and -0.8%, respectively, which was masked by a simultaneous increase in total fat mass (+2.0%). Among women, a decline in fat-free mass was observed after 2 yr only (-0.6%) with no change in ALST and body fat mass. After 2 yr, the decline in ALST was greater in blacks than whites. Change in total body mass was associated with change in ALST (r = +0.58 to +0.70; P < 0.0001). Among participants who lost total body mass, men lost relatively more ALST than women, and blacks lost relatively more ALST than whites. In conclusion, the mean change in body composition after a 1- to 2-yr follow-up was 1-2% with a high interindividual variability. Loss of ALST was greater in men compared with women, and greater in blacks compared with whites, suggesting that men and blacks may be more prone to muscle loss.

AB - Changing body composition has been suggested as a pathway to explain age-related functional decline. No data are available on the expected changes in body composition as measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in a population-based cohort of older persons. Body composition data at baseline, 1-yr follow-up, and 2-yr follow-up was measured by DXA in 2,040 well-functioning black and white men and women aged 70-79 yr, participants of the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study. After 2 yr, a small decline in total body mass was observed (men: -0.3%, women: -0.4%). Among men, fat-free mass and appendicular lean soft tissue mass (ALST) decreased by -1.1 and -0.8%, respectively, which was masked by a simultaneous increase in total fat mass (+2.0%). Among women, a decline in fat-free mass was observed after 2 yr only (-0.6%) with no change in ALST and body fat mass. After 2 yr, the decline in ALST was greater in blacks than whites. Change in total body mass was associated with change in ALST (r = +0.58 to +0.70; P < 0.0001). Among participants who lost total body mass, men lost relatively more ALST than women, and blacks lost relatively more ALST than whites. In conclusion, the mean change in body composition after a 1- to 2-yr follow-up was 1-2% with a high interindividual variability. Loss of ALST was greater in men compared with women, and greater in blacks compared with whites, suggesting that men and blacks may be more prone to muscle loss.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0038516918&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0038516918&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1152/japplphysiol.00124.2002

DO - 10.1152/japplphysiol.00124.2002

M3 - Article

C2 - 12598481

AN - SCOPUS:0038516918

VL - 94

SP - 2368

EP - 2374

JO - Journal of Applied Physiology

JF - Journal of Applied Physiology

SN - 8750-7587

IS - 6

ER -