Ontogeny of local sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ signals in cerebral arteries

Ca2+ sparks as elementary physiological events

Maik Gollasch, George C. Wellman, Harm J. Knot, Jonathan Jaggar, Deborah H. Damon, Adrian D. Bonev, Mark T. Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

89 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ca2+ release through ryanodine receptors (RyRs) in the sarcoplasmic reticulum is a key element of excitation-contraction coupling in muscle. In arterial smooth muscle, Ca2+ release through RyRs activates Ca2+- sensitive K+ (K(Ca)) channels to oppose vasoconstriction. Local Ca2+transients ('Ca2+ sparks'), apparently caused by opening of clustered RyRs, have been observed in smooth and striated muscle. We explored the fundamental issue of whether RyRs generate Ca2+ sparks to regulate arterial smooth muscle tone by examining the function of RyRs during ontogeny of arteries in the brain. In the present study, Ca2+ sparks were measured using the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator fluo-3 combined with laser scanning confocal microscopy. Diameter and arterial wall [Ca2+] measurements obtained from isolated pressurized arteries were also used in this study to provide functional insights. Neonatal arteries (<1 day postnatal), although still proliferative, have the molecular components for excitation-contraction coupling, including functional voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, RyRs, and K(Ca) channels and also constrict to elevations in intravascular pressure. Despite having functional RyRs, Ca2+ spark frequency in intact neonatal arteries was ≃1/100 of adult arteries. In marked contrast to adult arteries, neonatal arteries did not respond to inhibitors of RyRs and K(Ca) channels. These results support the hypothesis that RyRs organize during postnatal development to cause Ca2+ sparks, and RyRs must generate Ca2+ sparks to regulate the function of the intact tissue.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1104-1114
Number of pages11
JournalCirculation research
Volume83
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 30 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Release Channel
Cerebral Arteries
Sarcoplasmic Reticulum
Arteries
Smooth Muscle
Excitation Contraction Coupling
Striated Muscle
Vasoconstriction
Confocal Microscopy
Pressure
Muscles

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Ontogeny of local sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ signals in cerebral arteries : Ca2+ sparks as elementary physiological events. / Gollasch, Maik; Wellman, George C.; Knot, Harm J.; Jaggar, Jonathan; Damon, Deborah H.; Bonev, Adrian D.; Nelson, Mark T.

In: Circulation research, Vol. 83, No. 11, 30.11.1998, p. 1104-1114.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gollasch, Maik ; Wellman, George C. ; Knot, Harm J. ; Jaggar, Jonathan ; Damon, Deborah H. ; Bonev, Adrian D. ; Nelson, Mark T. / Ontogeny of local sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ signals in cerebral arteries : Ca2+ sparks as elementary physiological events. In: Circulation research. 1998 ; Vol. 83, No. 11. pp. 1104-1114.
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