Opioid-mediated suppression of cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cell respiratory burst activity

P. K. Peterson, Burt Sharp, G. Gekker, C. Brummitt, W. F. Keane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

108 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Opiate addiction and stress have been associated with altered immune responses. In this study, we evaluated the influence of morphine and the stress responsive opioid peptide β-endorphin (β-END) on O2- and H2O2 production by cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Exposure of these cells during 48 hr of culture to morphine and β-END at pharmacologically (10-8 M) and physiologically (10-12 M) relevant concentrations, respectively, markedly suppressed peripheral blood mononuclear cell O2- and H2O2 release in response to the respiratory burst stimuli opsonized zymosan and phorbol myristate acetate. Both opioids also induced a minimal, but statistically significant, increase in resting O2- and H2O2 generation. The modulatory effects of morphine and β-END on peripheral blood mononuclear cell oxygen metabolism appeared to involve a classical opioid receptor, because opioid activity was blocked by naloxone and was not observed with N-acetylated-β-END. Using purified lymphocyte and monocyte preparations, we determined that although opioids directly increase monocyte-resting oxygen metabolism, lymphocytes are the primary target cell in opioid-mediated suppression of monocyte respiratory burst activity. The release of a suppressive product from opioid-triggered lymphocytes was inhibited by cyclosporine. Based on the results of this study, we propose that opioid-mediated suppression of mononuclear phagocyte respiratory burst activity is another factor to be considered in the immunodeficiency of opiate addiction and stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3907-3912
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume138
Issue number11
StatePublished - Jul 24 1987

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Respiratory Burst
Opioid Analgesics
Blood Cells
Morphine
Opioid-Related Disorders
Monocytes
Lymphocytes
Oxygen
Endorphins
Zymosan
Opioid Peptides
Opioid Receptors
Tetradecanoylphorbol Acetate
Phagocytes
Naloxone
Cyclosporine

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Peterson, P. K., Sharp, B., Gekker, G., Brummitt, C., & Keane, W. F. (1987). Opioid-mediated suppression of cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cell respiratory burst activity. Journal of Immunology, 138(11), 3907-3912.

Opioid-mediated suppression of cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cell respiratory burst activity. / Peterson, P. K.; Sharp, Burt; Gekker, G.; Brummitt, C.; Keane, W. F.

In: Journal of Immunology, Vol. 138, No. 11, 24.07.1987, p. 3907-3912.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Peterson, PK, Sharp, B, Gekker, G, Brummitt, C & Keane, WF 1987, 'Opioid-mediated suppression of cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cell respiratory burst activity', Journal of Immunology, vol. 138, no. 11, pp. 3907-3912.
Peterson, P. K. ; Sharp, Burt ; Gekker, G. ; Brummitt, C. ; Keane, W. F. / Opioid-mediated suppression of cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cell respiratory burst activity. In: Journal of Immunology. 1987 ; Vol. 138, No. 11. pp. 3907-3912.
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