Opioid peptide levels in gerbil brain after transient ischemia

Lasting depletion of hippocampal dynorphin

Richard L. Fried, Thaddeus Nowak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Peptides derived from each of the 3 endogenous opioid precursors were measured in gerbil brain regions at various times after transient bilateral carotid artery occlusion using radioimmunoassays specific for β-endorphin-, met-enkephalin-, and dynorphin A-related peptides. Lasting changes were observed only in the hippocampus. The most striking effect was on dynorphin A immunoreactivity, which was reduced by 30–40% as early as 1 hour after recirculation and remained at 50% of the control level for at least 1 week. In some experiments dynorphin levels showed a transient recovery at 24 hours. These results demonstrate a unique sensitivity of the dynorphin-containing dentate granule cell-mossy fiber pathway to transient ischemia. Although these cells remain histologically intact, the decrease in dynorphin level precedes and continues during the delayed loss of hippocampal CA1 neurons characteristic of this model and further defines the selective vulnerability of hippocampal circuitry following ischemia. These observations clearly identify the hippocampus as a well-defined brain region in which further studies of the post ischemic path ophysio logy of endogenous opioid peptides may provide a rational basis for evaluating the place of opiate pharmacology in stroke treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)765-770
Number of pages6
JournalStroke
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1987

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Dynorphins
Opioid Peptides
Gerbillinae
Ischemia
Brain
Opiate Alkaloids
Hippocampus
Endorphins
Methionine Enkephalin
Peptides
Carotid Arteries
Opioid Analgesics
Radioimmunoassay
Stroke
Pharmacology
Neurons

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Opioid peptide levels in gerbil brain after transient ischemia : Lasting depletion of hippocampal dynorphin. / Fried, Richard L.; Nowak, Thaddeus.

In: Stroke, Vol. 18, No. 4, 01.01.1987, p. 765-770.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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