Opioid receptor expression and intracellular signaling by cells involved in host defense and immunity

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35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

After more than two decades of intensive study, there is clear evidence from multiple laboratories for the existence and regulated expression of opioid receptors by cells involved in host defense and immunity. At both the protein and mRNA levels, there is especially good evidence for DOR and KOR on T-cells and other immune cells in several species. In the case of KOR, expression is greater in lymphoid compartments (e.g., thymus) that contain immature cells. However, both DOR and KOR expression are enhanced in activated cells. In addition, T-cells show enhanced DOR expression as a function of increasing cell density, independent of activation through the TCR. Although both MOR and DOR agonists can stimulate ERK phosphorylation in lymphoid cells lines, the opposite occurs in normal T-cells. These agonists alone do not affect ERK phosphorylation; however, following preincubation, they do inhibit anti-CD3-ε-induced ERK phosphorylation in splenic T-cells. Based on these observations, along with the anti-proliferative effects of DOR agonists, DORs appear to be part of an inhibitory immunomodulatory system that can respond to both opioid neuro- and immunopeptides secreted locally by innervating neurons and immune cells, respectively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)98-105
Number of pages8
JournalAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Volume521
StatePublished - May 14 2003

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T-cells
Opioid Receptors
Phosphorylation
Immunity
T-Lymphocytes
Thymus
Neuropeptides
Opioid Analgesics
Neurons
Chemical activation
Thymus Gland
Cells
Messenger RNA
Cell Count
Lymphocytes
Cell Line
Proteins

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

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title = "Opioid receptor expression and intracellular signaling by cells involved in host defense and immunity",
abstract = "After more than two decades of intensive study, there is clear evidence from multiple laboratories for the existence and regulated expression of opioid receptors by cells involved in host defense and immunity. At both the protein and mRNA levels, there is especially good evidence for DOR and KOR on T-cells and other immune cells in several species. In the case of KOR, expression is greater in lymphoid compartments (e.g., thymus) that contain immature cells. However, both DOR and KOR expression are enhanced in activated cells. In addition, T-cells show enhanced DOR expression as a function of increasing cell density, independent of activation through the TCR. Although both MOR and DOR agonists can stimulate ERK phosphorylation in lymphoid cells lines, the opposite occurs in normal T-cells. These agonists alone do not affect ERK phosphorylation; however, following preincubation, they do inhibit anti-CD3-ε-induced ERK phosphorylation in splenic T-cells. Based on these observations, along with the anti-proliferative effects of DOR agonists, DORs appear to be part of an inhibitory immunomodulatory system that can respond to both opioid neuro- and immunopeptides secreted locally by innervating neurons and immune cells, respectively.",
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AU - Sharp, Burt

PY - 2003/5/14

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N2 - After more than two decades of intensive study, there is clear evidence from multiple laboratories for the existence and regulated expression of opioid receptors by cells involved in host defense and immunity. At both the protein and mRNA levels, there is especially good evidence for DOR and KOR on T-cells and other immune cells in several species. In the case of KOR, expression is greater in lymphoid compartments (e.g., thymus) that contain immature cells. However, both DOR and KOR expression are enhanced in activated cells. In addition, T-cells show enhanced DOR expression as a function of increasing cell density, independent of activation through the TCR. Although both MOR and DOR agonists can stimulate ERK phosphorylation in lymphoid cells lines, the opposite occurs in normal T-cells. These agonists alone do not affect ERK phosphorylation; however, following preincubation, they do inhibit anti-CD3-ε-induced ERK phosphorylation in splenic T-cells. Based on these observations, along with the anti-proliferative effects of DOR agonists, DORs appear to be part of an inhibitory immunomodulatory system that can respond to both opioid neuro- and immunopeptides secreted locally by innervating neurons and immune cells, respectively.

AB - After more than two decades of intensive study, there is clear evidence from multiple laboratories for the existence and regulated expression of opioid receptors by cells involved in host defense and immunity. At both the protein and mRNA levels, there is especially good evidence for DOR and KOR on T-cells and other immune cells in several species. In the case of KOR, expression is greater in lymphoid compartments (e.g., thymus) that contain immature cells. However, both DOR and KOR expression are enhanced in activated cells. In addition, T-cells show enhanced DOR expression as a function of increasing cell density, independent of activation through the TCR. Although both MOR and DOR agonists can stimulate ERK phosphorylation in lymphoid cells lines, the opposite occurs in normal T-cells. These agonists alone do not affect ERK phosphorylation; however, following preincubation, they do inhibit anti-CD3-ε-induced ERK phosphorylation in splenic T-cells. Based on these observations, along with the anti-proliferative effects of DOR agonists, DORs appear to be part of an inhibitory immunomodulatory system that can respond to both opioid neuro- and immunopeptides secreted locally by innervating neurons and immune cells, respectively.

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