Opioids and the prostanoid system in the control of cerebral blood flow in hypotensive piglets

W. M. Armstead, R. Mirro, D. W. Busija, Charles Leffler

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Abstract

The interaction between opioid and prostanoid mechanisms in the control of cerebral hemodynamics was investigated in the conscious hypotensive piglet. Radiomicrospheres were used to determine regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in piglets pretreated with the opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone, or its vehicle, saline, during normotension, hypotension, and after the administration of indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, during hypotension. Hemorrhage (30 ml/kg) decreased systemic arterial pressure from 68 ± 12 to 40 ± 10 mm Hg but did not decrease blood flow to any brain region. Indomethacin treatment (5 mg/kg) of hypotensive piglets decreased blood flow to all brain regions within 20 min; this decrease blood flow to all brain regions within 20 rebral vascular resistance of 65 and 281% at 20 and 40 min after treatment, respectively. In hypotensive piglets, cerebral oxygen consumption was reduced from 2.62 ± 0.71 to 0.53 ± 0.27 ml 100 g-1 min-1 and to 0.11 ± 0.04 ml 100 g-1 min-1 at 20 and 40 min following indomethacin, respectively. Treatment with naloxone (1 mg/kg) had no effect on rCBF, calculated cerebral vascular resistance, or cerebral oxygen consumption of normotensive or hypotensive piglets. However, decreases in CBF and oxygen consumption and increases in cerebral vascular resistance upon treatment of hypotensive piglets with indomethacin were attenuated in animals pretreated with naloxone. These data indicate that the removal of prostanoid modulation of an opioid-mediated constrictor influence on the cerebral circulation is a potential mechanism for the increase in cerebral vascular resistance that follows indomethacin treatment of hypotensive piglets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)380-387
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991

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Cerebrovascular Circulation
Indomethacin
Opioid Analgesics
Prostaglandins
Vascular Resistance
Naloxone
Oxygen Consumption
Regional Blood Flow
Hypotension
Brain
Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors
Narcotic Antagonists
Arterial Pressure
Hemodynamics
Hemorrhage

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Opioids and the prostanoid system in the control of cerebral blood flow in hypotensive piglets. / Armstead, W. M.; Mirro, R.; Busija, D. W.; Leffler, Charles.

In: Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, Vol. 11, No. 3, 01.01.1991, p. 380-387.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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