Optimal caloric intake for critically Ill patients

First, do no harm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite considerable efforts to define energy requirements for critically ill patients, no single method has been found to be precise and unbiased for all patients. As a result, clinicians have used various methods that may overestimate energy requirements for some patients. Provision of target caloric intake without regard to the complications of overfeeding, such as hyperglycemia, hypercapnia, or gastric feeding intolerance, could result in overall detrimental clinical outcome. Inadequate nutrition support is also associated with adverse clinical outcomes that necessitate optimization of delivery and tolerance of the nutrition regimen. A pivotal paper by Krishnan and colleagues published in 2003 brought these issues to the forefront of clinical practice. Key papers that support or refute the practice of "permissive underfeeding" are reviewed. Further research is necessary to determine the minimum amount of nutrition required to achieve a therapeutic benefit as well as to ascertain at what amount of additional nutrition intake offers no further improvement in clinical outcome

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)48-54
Number of pages7
JournalNutrition in Clinical Practice
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2011

Fingerprint

Energy Intake
Critical Illness
Hypercapnia
Hyperglycemia
Stomach
Research
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Optimal caloric intake for critically Ill patients : First, do no harm. / Dickerson, Roland.

In: Nutrition in Clinical Practice, Vol. 26, No. 1, 01.02.2011, p. 48-54.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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