Optimization of touchscreen-based behavioral paradigms in mice

Implications for building a battery of tasks taxing learning and memory functions

David Delotterie, Chantal Mathis, Jean Christophe Cassel, Cornelia Dorner-Ciossek, Anelise Marti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although many clinical pathological states are now detectable using imaging and biochemical analyses, neuropsychological tests are often considered as valuable complementary approaches to confirm diagnosis, especially for disorders like Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia. The touchscreen-based automated test battery, which was introduced two decades ago in humans to assess cognitive functions, has recently been successfully back-translated in monkeys and rodents. We focused on optimizing the protocol of three distinct behavioral paradigms in mice: two variants of the Paired Associates Learning (PAL) and the Visuo-Motor Conditional Learning (VMCL) tasks. Acquisition of these tasks was assessed in naive versus pre-trained mice. In naive mice, we managed to define testing conditions allowing significant improvements of learning performances over time in the three aforementioned tasks. In pre-trained mice, we observed differential acquisition rates after specific task combinations. Particularly, we identified that animals previously trained in the VMCL paradigm subsequently poorly learned the sPAL rule. Together with previous findings, these data confirm the feasibility of using such behavioral assays to evaluate the power of different models of cognitive dysfunction in mice. They also highlight the risk of interactions between tasks when rodents are run through a battery of different cognitive touchscreen paradigms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere100817
JournalPloS one
Volume9
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 24 2014

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Touch screens
learning
Learning
Data storage equipment
mice
Assays
Animals
Rodentia
Imaging techniques
rodents
Paired-Associate Learning
Testing
Neuropsychological Tests
Parkinson disease
testing
Alzheimer disease
cognition
Cognition
Haplorhini
monkeys

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Optimization of touchscreen-based behavioral paradigms in mice : Implications for building a battery of tasks taxing learning and memory functions. / Delotterie, David; Mathis, Chantal; Cassel, Jean Christophe; Dorner-Ciossek, Cornelia; Marti, Anelise.

In: PloS one, Vol. 9, No. 6, e100817, 24.06.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Delotterie, David ; Mathis, Chantal ; Cassel, Jean Christophe ; Dorner-Ciossek, Cornelia ; Marti, Anelise. / Optimization of touchscreen-based behavioral paradigms in mice : Implications for building a battery of tasks taxing learning and memory functions. In: PloS one. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 6.
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