Optimizing the pharmacology of acid control in acid-related disorders

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Clinical evidence supports the relationship between acid suppression and healing of duodenal ulceration and reflux esophagitis. In contrast to H2-receptor antagonists which suppress acid secretion by inhibiting the initial stimulation of the parietal cell, proton pump inhibitors directly inhibit hydrogen ion secretion and can, therefore, better provide the degree and duration of intragastric pH elevation necessary for the optimal management of duodenal ulceration and reflux esophagitis. Clinical studies have shown that proton pump inhibitors, such as omeprazole and lansoprazole, provide more rapid healing and higher healing rates for both duodenal ulcers and reflux esophagitis than do H2-receptor antagonists.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume92
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Duodenogastric Reflux
Peptic Esophagitis
Histamine H2 Receptors
Proton Pump Inhibitors
Pharmacology
Acids
Lansoprazole
Omeprazole
Duodenal Ulcer
Protons

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Optimizing the pharmacology of acid control in acid-related disorders. / Howden, Colin.

In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 92, No. 4, 01.04.1997.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d3b04b60122648d0a0d9446f063311e7,
title = "Optimizing the pharmacology of acid control in acid-related disorders",
abstract = "Clinical evidence supports the relationship between acid suppression and healing of duodenal ulceration and reflux esophagitis. In contrast to H2-receptor antagonists which suppress acid secretion by inhibiting the initial stimulation of the parietal cell, proton pump inhibitors directly inhibit hydrogen ion secretion and can, therefore, better provide the degree and duration of intragastric pH elevation necessary for the optimal management of duodenal ulceration and reflux esophagitis. Clinical studies have shown that proton pump inhibitors, such as omeprazole and lansoprazole, provide more rapid healing and higher healing rates for both duodenal ulcers and reflux esophagitis than do H2-receptor antagonists.",
author = "Colin Howden",
year = "1997",
month = "4",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "92",
journal = "American Journal of Gastroenterology",
issn = "0002-9270",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Optimizing the pharmacology of acid control in acid-related disorders

AU - Howden, Colin

PY - 1997/4/1

Y1 - 1997/4/1

N2 - Clinical evidence supports the relationship between acid suppression and healing of duodenal ulceration and reflux esophagitis. In contrast to H2-receptor antagonists which suppress acid secretion by inhibiting the initial stimulation of the parietal cell, proton pump inhibitors directly inhibit hydrogen ion secretion and can, therefore, better provide the degree and duration of intragastric pH elevation necessary for the optimal management of duodenal ulceration and reflux esophagitis. Clinical studies have shown that proton pump inhibitors, such as omeprazole and lansoprazole, provide more rapid healing and higher healing rates for both duodenal ulcers and reflux esophagitis than do H2-receptor antagonists.

AB - Clinical evidence supports the relationship between acid suppression and healing of duodenal ulceration and reflux esophagitis. In contrast to H2-receptor antagonists which suppress acid secretion by inhibiting the initial stimulation of the parietal cell, proton pump inhibitors directly inhibit hydrogen ion secretion and can, therefore, better provide the degree and duration of intragastric pH elevation necessary for the optimal management of duodenal ulceration and reflux esophagitis. Clinical studies have shown that proton pump inhibitors, such as omeprazole and lansoprazole, provide more rapid healing and higher healing rates for both duodenal ulcers and reflux esophagitis than do H2-receptor antagonists.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030977917&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030977917&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 92

JO - American Journal of Gastroenterology

JF - American Journal of Gastroenterology

SN - 0002-9270

IS - 4

ER -