Oral versus intravenous calcitriol

Is the route of administration really important?

O. S. Indridason, Leigh Quarles

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Deficiency of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D plays an important role in the pathogenesis of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Adequate replacement of this hormone is required to normalize parathyroid gland function and restore bone homeostasis in patients with advanced renal failure. Controversy exists regarding the best method of administering 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. Although initial, uncontrolled clinical trials suggested the superiority of intravenous calcitriol treatment, more recent controlled investigations have shown that different routes (oral versus intravenous), frequency (daily versus intermittent) and dosing (physiologic versus pharmacologic) of calcitriol administration are equivalent. Overall, the response to calcitriol treatment depends more on the severity of secondary hyperparathyroidism and the presence of confounding variables, such as hyperphosphatemia and acquired abnormalities of parathyroid cell function, than on the method of calcitriol administration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)307-312
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Calcitriol
Secondary Hyperparathyroidism
Hyperphosphatemia
Parathyroid Glands
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Renal Insufficiency
Homeostasis
Clinical Trials
Hormones
Bone and Bones
Therapeutics
1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Nephrology

Cite this

Oral versus intravenous calcitriol : Is the route of administration really important? / Indridason, O. S.; Quarles, Leigh.

In: Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension, Vol. 4, No. 4, 01.01.1995, p. 307-312.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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