Organization of Corticostriatal Projection Neuron Types

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This chapter reviews the models of neuronal circuitry that have been developed to account for the role of the basal ganglia in motor control–the so-called direct and indirect pathway model of basal ganglia function. This is a breakthrough in the understanding of basal ganglia function, and is effective at globally explaining the motor defects in ballismus, Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD), and predicting the palliative effects of internal pallidal segment lesions in PD. The basal ganglia participate in the learning of reward-motivated behavioral routines, and that corticostriatal plasticity in the form of potentiation of some synaptic inputs and inhibition of others underlies this process. The chapter discusses differences between direct and indirect pathway striatal neurons in the types of cortical input they receive are important for understanding how corticostriatal plasticity shapes motor routines. It is found that direct and indirect pathway striatal neurons do appear to differ in the types of cortical input they receive. It reviews the findings on corticostriatal organization, and discusses how they contribute to understanding the role of the basal ganglia in motor learning and movement selection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHandbook of Behavioral Neuroscience
Pages323-339
Number of pages17
EditionC
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Publication series

NameHandbook of Behavioral Neuroscience
NumberC
Volume20
ISSN (Print)1569-7339

Fingerprint

Basal Ganglia
Neurons
Corpus Striatum
Parkinson Disease
Learning
Huntington Disease
Dyskinesias
Reward

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Reiner, A. (2010). Organization of Corticostriatal Projection Neuron Types. In Handbook of Behavioral Neuroscience (C ed., pp. 323-339). (Handbook of Behavioral Neuroscience; Vol. 20, No. C). https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-374767-9.00018-4

Organization of Corticostriatal Projection Neuron Types. / Reiner, Anton.

Handbook of Behavioral Neuroscience. C. ed. 2010. p. 323-339 (Handbook of Behavioral Neuroscience; Vol. 20, No. C).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Reiner, A 2010, Organization of Corticostriatal Projection Neuron Types. in Handbook of Behavioral Neuroscience. C edn, Handbook of Behavioral Neuroscience, no. C, vol. 20, pp. 323-339. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-374767-9.00018-4
Reiner A. Organization of Corticostriatal Projection Neuron Types. In Handbook of Behavioral Neuroscience. C ed. 2010. p. 323-339. (Handbook of Behavioral Neuroscience; C). https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-374767-9.00018-4
Reiner, Anton. / Organization of Corticostriatal Projection Neuron Types. Handbook of Behavioral Neuroscience. C. ed. 2010. pp. 323-339 (Handbook of Behavioral Neuroscience; C).
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