Organization of the avian “corticostriatal” projection system

A retrograde and anterograde pathway tracing study in pigeons

C. Leo Veenman, J. Martin Wild, Anton Reiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

185 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Birds have well‐developed basal ganglia within the telencephalon, including a striatum consisting of the medially located lobus parolfactorius (LPO) and the laterally located paleostriatum augmentatum (PA), Relatively little is known, however, about the extent and organization of the telencephalic “cortical” input to the avian basal ganglia (i. e., the avian “corticostriatal” projection system). Using retrograde and anterograde neuroanatomical pathway tracers to address this issue, we found that a large continuous expanse of the outer pallium projects to the striatum of the basal ganglia in pigeons. This expanse includes the Wulst and archistriatum as well as the entire outer rind of the pallium intervening between Wulst and archistriatum, termed by us the pallium externum (PE). In addition, the caudolateral neostriatum (NCL), pyriform cortex, and hippocampal complex also give rise to striatal projections in pigeon. A restricted number of these pallial regions (such as the “limbic” NCL, pyriform cortex, and ventral/caudal parts of the archistriatum) project to such ventral striatal structures as the olfactory tubercle (TO), nucleus accumbens (Ac), and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST). Such “limbic” pallial areas also project to medialmost LPO and lateralmost PA, while the hyperstriatum accessorium portion of the Wulst, the PE, and the dorsal parts of the archistriatum were found to project primarily to the remainder of LPO (the lateral two‐thirds) and PA (the medial four‐fifths). The available evidence indicates that the diverse pallial regions projecting to the striatum in birds, as in mammals, are parts of higher order sensory or motor systems. The extensive corticostriatal system in both birds and mammals appears to include two types of pallial neurons: (1) those that project to both striatum and brainstem (i. e., those in the Wulst and the archistriatum) and (2) those that project to striatum but not to brainstem (i. e., those in the PE). The lack of extensive corticostriatal projections from either type of neuron in anamniotes suggests that the anamniote‐amniote evolutionary transition was marked by the emergence of the corticostriatal projection system as a prominent source of sensory and motor information for the striatum, possibly facilitating the role of the basal ganglia in movement control. © 1995 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)87-126
Number of pages40
JournalJournal of Comparative Neurology
Volume354
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

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Columbidae
Amygdala
Basal Ganglia
Globus Pallidus
Birds
Corpus Striatum
Telencephalon
Brain Stem
Mammals
Neostriatum
Neurons
Septal Nuclei
Nucleus Accumbens
Piriform Cortex

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Organization of the avian “corticostriatal” projection system : A retrograde and anterograde pathway tracing study in pigeons. / Veenman, C. Leo; Wild, J. Martin; Reiner, Anton.

In: Journal of Comparative Neurology, Vol. 354, No. 1, 01.01.1995, p. 87-126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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