Organizational structure, team process, and future directions of interprofessional health care teams

Kenneth D. Cole, Martha S. Waite, Linda Nichols

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

For a nationwide Geriatric Interdisciplinary Team Training (GITT) program evaluation of 8 sites and 26 teams, team evaluators developed a quantitative and qualitative team observation scale (TOS), examining structure, process, and outcome, with specific focus on the training function. Qualitative data provided an important expansion of quantitative data, highlighting positive effects that were not statistically significant, such as role modeling and training occurring within the clinical team. Qualitative data could also identify “too much” of a coded variable, such as time spent in individual team members' assessments and treatment plans. As healthcare organizations have increasing demands for productivity and changing reimbursement, traditional models of teamwork, with large teams and structured meetings, may no longer be as functional as they once were. To meet these constraints and to train students in teamwork, teams of the future will have to make choices, from developing and setting specific models to increasing the use of information technology to create virtual teams. Both quantitative and qualitative data will be needed to evaluate these new types of teams and the important outcomes they produce.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-49
Number of pages15
JournalGerontology and Geriatrics Education
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2 2003

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Patient Care Team
Program Evaluation
organizational structure
Geriatrics
Observation
health care
Students
Technology
Delivery of Health Care
Education
Therapeutics
teamwork
Direction compound
geriatrics
training program
productivity
information technology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Organizational structure, team process, and future directions of interprofessional health care teams. / Cole, Kenneth D.; Waite, Martha S.; Nichols, Linda.

In: Gerontology and Geriatrics Education, Vol. 24, No. 2, 02.02.2003, p. 35-49.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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