Orthopaedic surgeon modularity utilization and surgical technique considerations in the face of implant corrosion

Marcus C. Ford, John W. Harkess, William Mihalko

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The use of modular femoral components for total hip arthroplasty (THA) allows surgeons to adjust leg lengths, restore anatomy, and improve stability through alterations in femoral offset, neck length, and version; however, corrosion, fretting, and fatigue failure have raised concerns about these implants. To determine surgeons' opinions and trends regarding the use of modularity in THA, during 2013 and 2014 surveys were sent to American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons fellows to investigate the use of modularity in THA. The survey included questions regarding technique and basic science knowledge of modular components. Results from 2013 and 2014 were compared to evaluate trends in modular component use. Ninetynine surgeons (2013) and 106 surgeons (2014) responded, more than 93 % of whom routinely perform THA. More than 50 % of respondents were fellowship trained. Most respondents (>87 %) in both years reported that they had used a modular implant, either when absolutely necessary (<5 % of time) or routinely (>50 % of time). From 2013 to 2014, the routine use of modular metal-metal junction implants decreased (head-neck, neck-stem, stem-body). In 2014, a higher percentage of surgeons reported concerns over debris and stem breakage and more chose ceramic heads over metal heads. Most respondents reported locking the femoral head with one or more forceful hits. When corrosion was noted on the taper during revision cases, most surgeons retained the femur while cleaning the taper with either a sponge or bovie scratch pad. Some respondents applied a ceramic head with a titanium sleeve between the damaged taper and the new femoral head; 94 % of respondents reported cleaning and drying the taper before head insertion. These results demonstrate that modular implants are widely used in THA. The number of surgeons routinely using modular implants remains high, making education regarding debris production and breakage with modular stems a necessity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationModularity and Tapers in Total Joint Replacement Devices
PublisherASTM International
Pages10-16
Number of pages7
VolumeSTP 1591
ISBN (Electronic)9780803176270
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
EventSymposium on Modularity and Tapers in Total Joint Replacement Devices - New Orleans, United States
Duration: Nov 10 2014 → …

Other

OtherSymposium on Modularity and Tapers in Total Joint Replacement Devices
CountryUnited States
CityNew Orleans
Period11/10/14 → …

Fingerprint

Arthroplasty
Orthopedics
Corrosion
Metals
Debris
Cleaning
Fretting corrosion
Titanium
Drying
Education
Fatigue of materials

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Ford, M. C., Harkess, J. W., & Mihalko, W. (2015). Orthopaedic surgeon modularity utilization and surgical technique considerations in the face of implant corrosion. In Modularity and Tapers in Total Joint Replacement Devices (Vol. STP 1591, pp. 10-16). ASTM International. https://doi.org/10.1520/STP159120140140

Orthopaedic surgeon modularity utilization and surgical technique considerations in the face of implant corrosion. / Ford, Marcus C.; Harkess, John W.; Mihalko, William.

Modularity and Tapers in Total Joint Replacement Devices. Vol. STP 1591 ASTM International, 2015. p. 10-16.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Ford, MC, Harkess, JW & Mihalko, W 2015, Orthopaedic surgeon modularity utilization and surgical technique considerations in the face of implant corrosion. in Modularity and Tapers in Total Joint Replacement Devices. vol. STP 1591, ASTM International, pp. 10-16, Symposium on Modularity and Tapers in Total Joint Replacement Devices, New Orleans, United States, 11/10/14. https://doi.org/10.1520/STP159120140140
Ford MC, Harkess JW, Mihalko W. Orthopaedic surgeon modularity utilization and surgical technique considerations in the face of implant corrosion. In Modularity and Tapers in Total Joint Replacement Devices. Vol. STP 1591. ASTM International. 2015. p. 10-16 https://doi.org/10.1520/STP159120140140
Ford, Marcus C. ; Harkess, John W. ; Mihalko, William. / Orthopaedic surgeon modularity utilization and surgical technique considerations in the face of implant corrosion. Modularity and Tapers in Total Joint Replacement Devices. Vol. STP 1591 ASTM International, 2015. pp. 10-16
@inproceedings{2debce40839a4eb283cdf9d48cfa7146,
title = "Orthopaedic surgeon modularity utilization and surgical technique considerations in the face of implant corrosion",
abstract = "The use of modular femoral components for total hip arthroplasty (THA) allows surgeons to adjust leg lengths, restore anatomy, and improve stability through alterations in femoral offset, neck length, and version; however, corrosion, fretting, and fatigue failure have raised concerns about these implants. To determine surgeons' opinions and trends regarding the use of modularity in THA, during 2013 and 2014 surveys were sent to American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons fellows to investigate the use of modularity in THA. The survey included questions regarding technique and basic science knowledge of modular components. Results from 2013 and 2014 were compared to evaluate trends in modular component use. Ninetynine surgeons (2013) and 106 surgeons (2014) responded, more than 93 {\%} of whom routinely perform THA. More than 50 {\%} of respondents were fellowship trained. Most respondents (>87 {\%}) in both years reported that they had used a modular implant, either when absolutely necessary (<5 {\%} of time) or routinely (>50 {\%} of time). From 2013 to 2014, the routine use of modular metal-metal junction implants decreased (head-neck, neck-stem, stem-body). In 2014, a higher percentage of surgeons reported concerns over debris and stem breakage and more chose ceramic heads over metal heads. Most respondents reported locking the femoral head with one or more forceful hits. When corrosion was noted on the taper during revision cases, most surgeons retained the femur while cleaning the taper with either a sponge or bovie scratch pad. Some respondents applied a ceramic head with a titanium sleeve between the damaged taper and the new femoral head; 94 {\%} of respondents reported cleaning and drying the taper before head insertion. These results demonstrate that modular implants are widely used in THA. The number of surgeons routinely using modular implants remains high, making education regarding debris production and breakage with modular stems a necessity.",
author = "Ford, {Marcus C.} and Harkess, {John W.} and William Mihalko",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1520/STP159120140140",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "STP 1591",
pages = "10--16",
booktitle = "Modularity and Tapers in Total Joint Replacement Devices",
publisher = "ASTM International",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Orthopaedic surgeon modularity utilization and surgical technique considerations in the face of implant corrosion

AU - Ford, Marcus C.

AU - Harkess, John W.

AU - Mihalko, William

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - The use of modular femoral components for total hip arthroplasty (THA) allows surgeons to adjust leg lengths, restore anatomy, and improve stability through alterations in femoral offset, neck length, and version; however, corrosion, fretting, and fatigue failure have raised concerns about these implants. To determine surgeons' opinions and trends regarding the use of modularity in THA, during 2013 and 2014 surveys were sent to American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons fellows to investigate the use of modularity in THA. The survey included questions regarding technique and basic science knowledge of modular components. Results from 2013 and 2014 were compared to evaluate trends in modular component use. Ninetynine surgeons (2013) and 106 surgeons (2014) responded, more than 93 % of whom routinely perform THA. More than 50 % of respondents were fellowship trained. Most respondents (>87 %) in both years reported that they had used a modular implant, either when absolutely necessary (<5 % of time) or routinely (>50 % of time). From 2013 to 2014, the routine use of modular metal-metal junction implants decreased (head-neck, neck-stem, stem-body). In 2014, a higher percentage of surgeons reported concerns over debris and stem breakage and more chose ceramic heads over metal heads. Most respondents reported locking the femoral head with one or more forceful hits. When corrosion was noted on the taper during revision cases, most surgeons retained the femur while cleaning the taper with either a sponge or bovie scratch pad. Some respondents applied a ceramic head with a titanium sleeve between the damaged taper and the new femoral head; 94 % of respondents reported cleaning and drying the taper before head insertion. These results demonstrate that modular implants are widely used in THA. The number of surgeons routinely using modular implants remains high, making education regarding debris production and breakage with modular stems a necessity.

AB - The use of modular femoral components for total hip arthroplasty (THA) allows surgeons to adjust leg lengths, restore anatomy, and improve stability through alterations in femoral offset, neck length, and version; however, corrosion, fretting, and fatigue failure have raised concerns about these implants. To determine surgeons' opinions and trends regarding the use of modularity in THA, during 2013 and 2014 surveys were sent to American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons fellows to investigate the use of modularity in THA. The survey included questions regarding technique and basic science knowledge of modular components. Results from 2013 and 2014 were compared to evaluate trends in modular component use. Ninetynine surgeons (2013) and 106 surgeons (2014) responded, more than 93 % of whom routinely perform THA. More than 50 % of respondents were fellowship trained. Most respondents (>87 %) in both years reported that they had used a modular implant, either when absolutely necessary (<5 % of time) or routinely (>50 % of time). From 2013 to 2014, the routine use of modular metal-metal junction implants decreased (head-neck, neck-stem, stem-body). In 2014, a higher percentage of surgeons reported concerns over debris and stem breakage and more chose ceramic heads over metal heads. Most respondents reported locking the femoral head with one or more forceful hits. When corrosion was noted on the taper during revision cases, most surgeons retained the femur while cleaning the taper with either a sponge or bovie scratch pad. Some respondents applied a ceramic head with a titanium sleeve between the damaged taper and the new femoral head; 94 % of respondents reported cleaning and drying the taper before head insertion. These results demonstrate that modular implants are widely used in THA. The number of surgeons routinely using modular implants remains high, making education regarding debris production and breakage with modular stems a necessity.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84961944279&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84961944279&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1520/STP159120140140

DO - 10.1520/STP159120140140

M3 - Conference contribution

VL - STP 1591

SP - 10

EP - 16

BT - Modularity and Tapers in Total Joint Replacement Devices

PB - ASTM International

ER -