Orthostatic changes in systolic blood pressure among SPRINT participants at baseline

SPRINT Study Research Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Orthostatic changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP) impact cardiovascular outcomes. In this study, we aimed to determine the pattern of orthostatic systolic pressure changes in participants enrolled in the SBP Intervention Trial (SPRINT) at their baseline visit before randomization and sought to understand clinical factors predictive of these changes. Of the 9323 participants enrolled in SPRINT, 8662 had complete data for these analyses. The SBP after 1 minute of standing was subtracted from the mean value of the three preceding seated SBP values. At the baseline visit, medical history, medications, anthropometric measures, and standard laboratory testing were undertaken. The mean age of SPRINT participants was 68 years, two-thirds were male, with 30% black, 11% Hispanic, and 55% Caucasian. The spectrum of SBP changes on standing demonstrated that increases in SBP were as common as declines, and about 5% of participants had an increase, and 5% had a decrease of >20 mm Hg in SBP upon standing. Female sex, taller height, more advanced kidney disease, current smoking, and several drug classes were associated with larger declines in BP upon standing, while black race, higher blood levels of glucose and sodium, and heavier weight were associated with more positive values of the change in BP upon standing. Our cross-sectional results show a significant spectrum of orthostatic SBP changes, reflecting known (eg, age) and less well-known (eg, kidney function) relationships that may be important considerations in determining the optimal target blood pressure in long-term outcomes of older hypertensive patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)847-856
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Society of Hypertension
Volume10
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

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Blood Pressure
Kidney Diseases
Random Allocation
Hispanic Americans
Blood Glucose
Smoking
Sodium
Kidney
Weights and Measures

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Orthostatic changes in systolic blood pressure among SPRINT participants at baseline. / SPRINT Study Research Group.

In: Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Vol. 10, No. 11, 01.11.2016, p. 847-856.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Orthostatic changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP) impact cardiovascular outcomes. In this study, we aimed to determine the pattern of orthostatic systolic pressure changes in participants enrolled in the SBP Intervention Trial (SPRINT) at their baseline visit before randomization and sought to understand clinical factors predictive of these changes. Of the 9323 participants enrolled in SPRINT, 8662 had complete data for these analyses. The SBP after 1 minute of standing was subtracted from the mean value of the three preceding seated SBP values. At the baseline visit, medical history, medications, anthropometric measures, and standard laboratory testing were undertaken. The mean age of SPRINT participants was 68 years, two-thirds were male, with 30{\%} black, 11{\%} Hispanic, and 55{\%} Caucasian. The spectrum of SBP changes on standing demonstrated that increases in SBP were as common as declines, and about 5{\%} of participants had an increase, and 5{\%} had a decrease of >20 mm Hg in SBP upon standing. Female sex, taller height, more advanced kidney disease, current smoking, and several drug classes were associated with larger declines in BP upon standing, while black race, higher blood levels of glucose and sodium, and heavier weight were associated with more positive values of the change in BP upon standing. Our cross-sectional results show a significant spectrum of orthostatic SBP changes, reflecting known (eg, age) and less well-known (eg, kidney function) relationships that may be important considerations in determining the optimal target blood pressure in long-term outcomes of older hypertensive patients.",
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AU - Cushman, William C.

AU - Cushman, William

AU - Glasser, Stephen P.

AU - Haley, William E.

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AU - Del Pinto, Rita

AU - Pisoni, Roberto

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AU - Wright, Jackson T.

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