Osteogenic protein‐1, a bone morphogenic protein member of the TGF‐β superfamily, shares chemotactic but not fibrogenic properties with TGF‐β

Arnold Postlethwaite, Rajendra Raghow, George Stricklin, Leslie Ballou, T. Kuber Sampath

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Abstract

We have previously shown that recombinant human osteogenic protein‐1 (rhOP‐1), a bone morphogenetic protein member of the TGF‐β superfamily, can induce new bone formation when implanted with an appropriate carrier at subcutaneous sites in rats and can restore completely large diaphyseal segmental defects in laboratory animals. The role of OP‐1 in the early events of bone induction viz, chemotaxis of phagocytic leukocytes, and fibroblastic mesenchymal cells is currently unknown. In the present study, we examined the effect of rhOP‐1 on chemotaxis of phagocytic leukocytes (human neutrophils and monocytes) and fibroblastic mesenchymal cells (infant foreskin fibroblasts). Since OP‐1 is structurally related to TGF‐β1, we assessed the effects of OP‐1 on several other fibroblast functions (in addition to chemotaxis) known to be modulated by TGF‐β1. Our results demonstrated that rhOP‐1, like TGF‐β1, is a potent chemoattractant for human neutrophils, monocytes, and fibroblasts. However, in contrast to TGF‐β1, OP‐1 does not to stimulate fibroblast mitogenesis, matrix synthesis [collagen and hyaluronic acid (hyaluronan)], or production of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP), i.e., fibroblast functions associated with fibrogenesis. These results clearly demonstrate a dichotomy between these two members of the TGF‐β superfamily with regard to fibrogenic effects on fibroblasts but a similarity in their chemotactic properties. © 1994 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)562-570
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of cellular physiology
Volume161
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

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Fibroblasts
Bone
Bone and Bones
Leukocyte Chemotaxis
Proteins
Hyaluronic Acid
Monocytes
Neutrophils
Foreskin
Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinases
Bone Morphogenetic Proteins
Chemotactic Factors
Laboratory Animals
Chemotaxis
Osteogenesis
Rats
Animals
Collagen
Defects

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

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Osteogenic protein‐1, a bone morphogenic protein member of the TGF‐β superfamily, shares chemotactic but not fibrogenic properties with TGF‐β. / Postlethwaite, Arnold; Raghow, Rajendra; Stricklin, George; Ballou, Leslie; Sampath, T. Kuber.

In: Journal of cellular physiology, Vol. 161, No. 3, 01.01.1994, p. 562-570.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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