Outcomes of coronary artery revascularization procedures in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome

Navid Ahmed, Himali Gandhi, Eliany Mejia Lopez, Neeraja Yedlapati, Daniel Spevack

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Published data on the outcome of coronary artery revascularization in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are limited. Because APS is associated with a high rate of arterial thrombosis, there is concern that coronary revascularization in this group may be complicated by increased need for repeat revascularization. We aimed to determine the incidence and timing of repeat revascularization performed in patients with APS undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Methods: Our institutional database was queried for individuals (n = 575) testing positive for antiphospholipid antibodies between 2000 and 2012. From this group, 46 patients underwent cardiac catheterization. Charts were reviewed to identify subsequent revascularization procedures. Results: The study sample consisted of 15 patients (67 ± 11 years, 11 females) who underwent revascularization. All of the study subjects had prior history of arterial (stroke, TIA n = 7) or venous (n = 10) thrombosis. Ten of the subjects had initial revascularization (6 CABG, 4 PCI) at an outside facility, while another five underwent initial PCI at our hospital. Repeat revascularization occurred in five patients (33%) at a median of 6 years (range 4, 13) following the initial revascularization. The median follow-up for patients who did not require repeat revascularization (n = 10) was 10 years (range 2, 15). Conclusion: Amongst patients with APS who underwent CABG or PCI the need for repeat revascularization was infrequent and occurred several years after initial procedure. Based on this small sample size the periprocedural risk associated with coronary artery revascularization in subjects with APS is not prohibitively high.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCardiovascular Revascularization Medicine
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Antiphospholipid Syndrome
Coronary Vessels
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Coronary Artery Bypass
Thrombosis
Antiphospholipid Antibodies
Cardiac Catheterization
Sample Size
Stroke
Databases
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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Outcomes of coronary artery revascularization procedures in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome. / Ahmed, Navid; Gandhi, Himali; Lopez, Eliany Mejia; Yedlapati, Neeraja; Spevack, Daniel.

In: Cardiovascular Revascularization Medicine, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Published data on the outcome of coronary artery revascularization in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are limited. Because APS is associated with a high rate of arterial thrombosis, there is concern that coronary revascularization in this group may be complicated by increased need for repeat revascularization. We aimed to determine the incidence and timing of repeat revascularization performed in patients with APS undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Methods: Our institutional database was queried for individuals (n = 575) testing positive for antiphospholipid antibodies between 2000 and 2012. From this group, 46 patients underwent cardiac catheterization. Charts were reviewed to identify subsequent revascularization procedures. Results: The study sample consisted of 15 patients (67 ± 11 years, 11 females) who underwent revascularization. All of the study subjects had prior history of arterial (stroke, TIA n = 7) or venous (n = 10) thrombosis. Ten of the subjects had initial revascularization (6 CABG, 4 PCI) at an outside facility, while another five underwent initial PCI at our hospital. Repeat revascularization occurred in five patients (33{\%}) at a median of 6 years (range 4, 13) following the initial revascularization. The median follow-up for patients who did not require repeat revascularization (n = 10) was 10 years (range 2, 15). Conclusion: Amongst patients with APS who underwent CABG or PCI the need for repeat revascularization was infrequent and occurred several years after initial procedure. Based on this small sample size the periprocedural risk associated with coronary artery revascularization in subjects with APS is not prohibitively high.",
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AU - Gandhi, Himali

AU - Lopez, Eliany Mejia

AU - Yedlapati, Neeraja

AU - Spevack, Daniel

PY - 2019/1/1

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N2 - Background: Published data on the outcome of coronary artery revascularization in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are limited. Because APS is associated with a high rate of arterial thrombosis, there is concern that coronary revascularization in this group may be complicated by increased need for repeat revascularization. We aimed to determine the incidence and timing of repeat revascularization performed in patients with APS undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Methods: Our institutional database was queried for individuals (n = 575) testing positive for antiphospholipid antibodies between 2000 and 2012. From this group, 46 patients underwent cardiac catheterization. Charts were reviewed to identify subsequent revascularization procedures. Results: The study sample consisted of 15 patients (67 ± 11 years, 11 females) who underwent revascularization. All of the study subjects had prior history of arterial (stroke, TIA n = 7) or venous (n = 10) thrombosis. Ten of the subjects had initial revascularization (6 CABG, 4 PCI) at an outside facility, while another five underwent initial PCI at our hospital. Repeat revascularization occurred in five patients (33%) at a median of 6 years (range 4, 13) following the initial revascularization. The median follow-up for patients who did not require repeat revascularization (n = 10) was 10 years (range 2, 15). Conclusion: Amongst patients with APS who underwent CABG or PCI the need for repeat revascularization was infrequent and occurred several years after initial procedure. Based on this small sample size the periprocedural risk associated with coronary artery revascularization in subjects with APS is not prohibitively high.

AB - Background: Published data on the outcome of coronary artery revascularization in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are limited. Because APS is associated with a high rate of arterial thrombosis, there is concern that coronary revascularization in this group may be complicated by increased need for repeat revascularization. We aimed to determine the incidence and timing of repeat revascularization performed in patients with APS undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Methods: Our institutional database was queried for individuals (n = 575) testing positive for antiphospholipid antibodies between 2000 and 2012. From this group, 46 patients underwent cardiac catheterization. Charts were reviewed to identify subsequent revascularization procedures. Results: The study sample consisted of 15 patients (67 ± 11 years, 11 females) who underwent revascularization. All of the study subjects had prior history of arterial (stroke, TIA n = 7) or venous (n = 10) thrombosis. Ten of the subjects had initial revascularization (6 CABG, 4 PCI) at an outside facility, while another five underwent initial PCI at our hospital. Repeat revascularization occurred in five patients (33%) at a median of 6 years (range 4, 13) following the initial revascularization. The median follow-up for patients who did not require repeat revascularization (n = 10) was 10 years (range 2, 15). Conclusion: Amongst patients with APS who underwent CABG or PCI the need for repeat revascularization was infrequent and occurred several years after initial procedure. Based on this small sample size the periprocedural risk associated with coronary artery revascularization in subjects with APS is not prohibitively high.

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