Outrunning the risks: A behavioral risk profile of runners

Gregory Heath, J. S. Kendrick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is a need to assess better the relationship between physical activity and other health behaviors through population-based studies. Using the state-based Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, we examined the behavioral risk factors of smoking, alcoho use, hypertension detection, obesity, seat-belt use, and physical activity in 2,412 runners and 26,538 nonrunners. Our analyses demonstrated marked differences in behavioral risk profiles between runners and nonrunners. Runners, regardless of the amount of running, were more likely to be nonsmokers, be of normal weight, be normotensive, and regularly use seat belts than were nonrunners of similar age and sex. Patterns of alcohol use were not different when comparing male runners with male nonrunners. However, female runners were more likely to drink and drive and to use of alcohol on a chronic basis compared to their nonrunning counterparts. The 'runner's lifestyle' may convey a certain level of protection from chronic disorders that are associated with these risk factors. However, further prospective studies are needed to examine in more detail in the relationships of running to the risks and/or benefits for improved health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)347-352
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume5
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 1 1989

Fingerprint

Seat Belts
Alcohols
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Health Behavior
Life Style
Obesity
Smoking
Prospective Studies
Hypertension
Weights and Measures
Health
Population
Drive

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Outrunning the risks : A behavioral risk profile of runners. / Heath, Gregory; Kendrick, J. S.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 5, No. 6, 01.12.1989, p. 347-352.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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