Oxidative stress mediated neuronal damage in the corpus striatum of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned Parkinson's rats

Neuroprotection by Serotonin, GABA and Bone Marrow Cells Supplementation

Korah Pushpamangalam Kuruvilla, M. S. Nandhu, Jes Paul, C. S. Paulose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death has been implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD). Oxidative stress initiated by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) causesmitochondrial dysfunction leading to apoptosis and Parkinsonian neurodegeneration. We investigated the neuroprotective potential of serotonin (5-HT), gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) and autologous bone marrow cells (BMC) in combination against oxidative stress-induced cell death. PD was induced in adult male Wistar rats by intranigral infusion of 6-OHDA (8 μg/μl). The activities of antioxidant enzymes - superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were analysed. The extent of lipid peroxidation was quantified by measuring the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARs). Real Time PCR gene expression of SOD, CAT and GPx were performed using specific Taqman probes. 6-OHDA induced decreased activity of SOD, CAT and GPx in corpus striatum was significantly reversed to near control (p < 0.001) by treatment with 5-HT, GABA and bone marrow cells. Gene expression studies of SOD, CAT and GPx using Real Time PCR confirmed the above observation. TBAR levels were elevated (p < 0.001) in 6-OHDA treated rats indicating lipid peroxidation. 5-HT and GABA along with autologous bone marrow cell supplementation significantly ameliorated 6-OHDA-induced lipid peroxidation (p < 0.001). Our results suggest a new therapeutic strategy of neuroprotection against damage by oxidative stress in Parkinson's disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-37
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the Neurological Sciences
Volume331
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 15 2013

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Corpus Striatum
Butyric Acid
Oxidopamine
Bone Marrow Cells
Serotonin
Oxidative Stress
Glutathione Peroxidase
Catalase
Superoxide Dismutase
Lipid Peroxidation
Parkinson Disease
Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Cell Death
Gene Expression
Neuroprotection
Wistar Rats
Antioxidants
Observation
Apoptosis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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title = "Oxidative stress mediated neuronal damage in the corpus striatum of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned Parkinson's rats: Neuroprotection by Serotonin, GABA and Bone Marrow Cells Supplementation",
abstract = "Oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death has been implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD). Oxidative stress initiated by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) causesmitochondrial dysfunction leading to apoptosis and Parkinsonian neurodegeneration. We investigated the neuroprotective potential of serotonin (5-HT), gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) and autologous bone marrow cells (BMC) in combination against oxidative stress-induced cell death. PD was induced in adult male Wistar rats by intranigral infusion of 6-OHDA (8 μg/μl). The activities of antioxidant enzymes - superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were analysed. The extent of lipid peroxidation was quantified by measuring the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARs). Real Time PCR gene expression of SOD, CAT and GPx were performed using specific Taqman probes. 6-OHDA induced decreased activity of SOD, CAT and GPx in corpus striatum was significantly reversed to near control (p < 0.001) by treatment with 5-HT, GABA and bone marrow cells. Gene expression studies of SOD, CAT and GPx using Real Time PCR confirmed the above observation. TBAR levels were elevated (p < 0.001) in 6-OHDA treated rats indicating lipid peroxidation. 5-HT and GABA along with autologous bone marrow cell supplementation significantly ameliorated 6-OHDA-induced lipid peroxidation (p < 0.001). Our results suggest a new therapeutic strategy of neuroprotection against damage by oxidative stress in Parkinson's disease.",
author = "{Pushpamangalam Kuruvilla}, Korah and Nandhu, {M. S.} and Jes Paul and Paulose, {C. S.}",
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T2 - Neuroprotection by Serotonin, GABA and Bone Marrow Cells Supplementation

AU - Pushpamangalam Kuruvilla, Korah

AU - Nandhu, M. S.

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AU - Paulose, C. S.

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