Pacing as a treatment technique for transitional sucking patterns

Leslie Law-Morstatt, Debra M. Judd, Patricia Snyder, R. John Baier, Ramasubbareddy Dhanireddy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To ascertain whether the implementation of a paced feeding protocol in a sample of preterm infants with respiratory diagnoses with result in the development of more efficient sucking patterns, increased weight gain, decreased incidence of bradycardia during feeding, and shorter length of hospital stay. Method: A total of 36 premature infants were enrolled into a nonrandomized clinical trial conducted in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The first 18 infants were traditionally bottle-fed. Following this cohort's discharge from NICU, nursing staff completed continuing education on implementing a paced feeding protocol and the next 18 infants were delivered paced feedings. Results: The two cohorts were equivalent at the initiation of oral feedings on gestational age, birth weight, 1 and 5 minute Apgar scores, weight, and postconceptual age. The paced infants demonstrated statistically and clinically significant decreases in bradycardic incidences during feeding and gains in development of more efficient sucking patterns at discharge. Discharge and average weekly weight gain did not differ between the two groups. Conclusions: The incorporation of pacing into NICU care practices appears to be beneficial for preterm infants with respiratory disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)483-488
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Perinatology
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2003

Fingerprint

Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Premature Infants
Weight Gain
Length of Stay
Critical Care Nursing
Apgar Score
Nursing Staff
Continuing Education
Incidence
Bradycardia
Birth Weight
Gestational Age
Therapeutics
Weights and Measures

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Pacing as a treatment technique for transitional sucking patterns. / Law-Morstatt, Leslie; Judd, Debra M.; Snyder, Patricia; Baier, R. John; Dhanireddy, Ramasubbareddy.

In: Journal of Perinatology, Vol. 23, No. 6, 01.09.2003, p. 483-488.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Law-Morstatt, Leslie ; Judd, Debra M. ; Snyder, Patricia ; Baier, R. John ; Dhanireddy, Ramasubbareddy. / Pacing as a treatment technique for transitional sucking patterns. In: Journal of Perinatology. 2003 ; Vol. 23, No. 6. pp. 483-488.
@article{49aa28d2837c4f80b44579192bc4c00f,
title = "Pacing as a treatment technique for transitional sucking patterns",
abstract = "Objective: To ascertain whether the implementation of a paced feeding protocol in a sample of preterm infants with respiratory diagnoses with result in the development of more efficient sucking patterns, increased weight gain, decreased incidence of bradycardia during feeding, and shorter length of hospital stay. Method: A total of 36 premature infants were enrolled into a nonrandomized clinical trial conducted in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The first 18 infants were traditionally bottle-fed. Following this cohort's discharge from NICU, nursing staff completed continuing education on implementing a paced feeding protocol and the next 18 infants were delivered paced feedings. Results: The two cohorts were equivalent at the initiation of oral feedings on gestational age, birth weight, 1 and 5 minute Apgar scores, weight, and postconceptual age. The paced infants demonstrated statistically and clinically significant decreases in bradycardic incidences during feeding and gains in development of more efficient sucking patterns at discharge. Discharge and average weekly weight gain did not differ between the two groups. Conclusions: The incorporation of pacing into NICU care practices appears to be beneficial for preterm infants with respiratory disease.",
author = "Leslie Law-Morstatt and Judd, {Debra M.} and Patricia Snyder and Baier, {R. John} and Ramasubbareddy Dhanireddy",
year = "2003",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/sj.jp.7210976",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "483--488",
journal = "Journal of Perinatology",
issn = "0743-8346",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pacing as a treatment technique for transitional sucking patterns

AU - Law-Morstatt, Leslie

AU - Judd, Debra M.

AU - Snyder, Patricia

AU - Baier, R. John

AU - Dhanireddy, Ramasubbareddy

PY - 2003/9/1

Y1 - 2003/9/1

N2 - Objective: To ascertain whether the implementation of a paced feeding protocol in a sample of preterm infants with respiratory diagnoses with result in the development of more efficient sucking patterns, increased weight gain, decreased incidence of bradycardia during feeding, and shorter length of hospital stay. Method: A total of 36 premature infants were enrolled into a nonrandomized clinical trial conducted in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The first 18 infants were traditionally bottle-fed. Following this cohort's discharge from NICU, nursing staff completed continuing education on implementing a paced feeding protocol and the next 18 infants were delivered paced feedings. Results: The two cohorts were equivalent at the initiation of oral feedings on gestational age, birth weight, 1 and 5 minute Apgar scores, weight, and postconceptual age. The paced infants demonstrated statistically and clinically significant decreases in bradycardic incidences during feeding and gains in development of more efficient sucking patterns at discharge. Discharge and average weekly weight gain did not differ between the two groups. Conclusions: The incorporation of pacing into NICU care practices appears to be beneficial for preterm infants with respiratory disease.

AB - Objective: To ascertain whether the implementation of a paced feeding protocol in a sample of preterm infants with respiratory diagnoses with result in the development of more efficient sucking patterns, increased weight gain, decreased incidence of bradycardia during feeding, and shorter length of hospital stay. Method: A total of 36 premature infants were enrolled into a nonrandomized clinical trial conducted in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The first 18 infants were traditionally bottle-fed. Following this cohort's discharge from NICU, nursing staff completed continuing education on implementing a paced feeding protocol and the next 18 infants were delivered paced feedings. Results: The two cohorts were equivalent at the initiation of oral feedings on gestational age, birth weight, 1 and 5 minute Apgar scores, weight, and postconceptual age. The paced infants demonstrated statistically and clinically significant decreases in bradycardic incidences during feeding and gains in development of more efficient sucking patterns at discharge. Discharge and average weekly weight gain did not differ between the two groups. Conclusions: The incorporation of pacing into NICU care practices appears to be beneficial for preterm infants with respiratory disease.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0141893419&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0141893419&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/sj.jp.7210976

DO - 10.1038/sj.jp.7210976

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 483

EP - 488

JO - Journal of Perinatology

JF - Journal of Perinatology

SN - 0743-8346

IS - 6

ER -