Pain reports in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus

Susan T. Tran, Katherine S. Salamon, Keri R. Hainsworth, Jessica C. Kichler, W. Hobart Davies, Ramin Alemzadeh, Steven J. Weisman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to examine prevalence rates of pain reports in youth with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and potential predictors of pain. Pain is a common and debilitating symptom of diabetic polyneuropathies. There is currently little research regarding pain in youth with T1DM. It was predicted that self-care and general health factors would predict pain as suggested by the general pain literature. Participants (N = 269) ranged in age from 13 to 17 years; youth had a mean time since diagnosis of 5.8 years. Data collected included diabetes self-management variables, ratings of the patient’s current functioning and pain intensity (‘current’), and information collected about experiences that occurred in the time preceding each appointment (‘interim’). About half of the youth (n = 121, 49.0%) reported any interim pain across both appointments. Female adolescents and those individuals who were physically active and/or utilized health-care system more acutely were more likely to report interim central nervous system pain. Improved diabetes self-management and increased level of physical activity may reduce experiences of pain and increase the quality of life of youth with T1DM. Regular monitoring of both current and interim pain experiences of youth with T1DM is recommended.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-52
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Child Health Care
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 19 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Pain
Self Care
Appointments and Schedules
Diabetic Neuropathies
Central Nervous System
Quality of Life
Exercise
Delivery of Health Care
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Pediatrics

Cite this

Tran, S. T., Salamon, K. S., Hainsworth, K. R., Kichler, J. C., Davies, W. H., Alemzadeh, R., & Weisman, S. J. (2015). Pain reports in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Journal of Child Health Care, 19(1), 43-52. https://doi.org/10.1177/1367493513496908

Pain reports in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. / Tran, Susan T.; Salamon, Katherine S.; Hainsworth, Keri R.; Kichler, Jessica C.; Davies, W. Hobart; Alemzadeh, Ramin; Weisman, Steven J.

In: Journal of Child Health Care, Vol. 19, No. 1, 19.03.2015, p. 43-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tran, ST, Salamon, KS, Hainsworth, KR, Kichler, JC, Davies, WH, Alemzadeh, R & Weisman, SJ 2015, 'Pain reports in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus', Journal of Child Health Care, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 43-52. https://doi.org/10.1177/1367493513496908
Tran, Susan T. ; Salamon, Katherine S. ; Hainsworth, Keri R. ; Kichler, Jessica C. ; Davies, W. Hobart ; Alemzadeh, Ramin ; Weisman, Steven J. / Pain reports in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. In: Journal of Child Health Care. 2015 ; Vol. 19, No. 1. pp. 43-52.
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