Painful neuroma treatment of the supraorbital nerve and forehead neurotization using human cadaveric nerve allograft

Samer Bassilios Habre, James Bradford Depew, Robert Wallace, Petros Konofaos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Neuroma pain can be severe, persistent, and treatment-resistant. Forehead and scalp anesthesia is troublesome for patients. Following an iatrogenic ablative injury to the right supraorbital nerve, with subsequent painful neuroma formation, a human cadaveric nerve allograft (AxoGen, Alachua, FL) was used to restore sensation of the right forehead and treat pain. At 1-year follow-up, the patient was pain-free, and protective sensation to the right forehead was recovered with comparable static and dynamic 2-point discrimination between the injured (20 mm, 12 mm respectively) and the normal side (15 mm, 10 mm respectively). This is the first reported case of using a cadaver nerve allograft for successful direct neurotization of the skin and restoration of sensation in the upper part of the face, and for treating painful neuromas. Moreover, a brief review of the available techniques for treating neuromas of the supraorbital and supratrochlear nerves is provided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1023-1025
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Craniofacial Surgery
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018

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Nerve Transfer
Neuroma
Forehead
Allografts
Pain
Therapeutics
Scalp
Cadaver
Anesthesia
Skin
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Painful neuroma treatment of the supraorbital nerve and forehead neurotization using human cadaveric nerve allograft. / Bassilios Habre, Samer; Depew, James Bradford; Wallace, Robert; Konofaos, Petros.

In: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, Vol. 29, No. 4, 01.06.2018, p. 1023-1025.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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