Panniculectomy in the gynecologic and gynecologic oncology patient

Case Series and Literature Review

Eric D. Swisher, Joseph F. Pohl, Robert R. Taylor, Mark Reed, Lynn S. Farnsworth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Obesity poses a significant challenge to the pelvic surgeon and increases perioperative morbidity. Although the combination of plastic surgery with gynecology has not been the traditional standard, improved exposure, wound hygiene, and cosmesis may make panniculectomy a useful addition to pelvic procedures in the obese patient. Methods: Eighteen women, mean age 46 (range 36 to 72), underwent various benign gynecologic (total abdominal and vaginal hysterectomies, posterior repair, and sacrospinous ligament fixation) and gynecologic oncology procedures (total abdominal hysterectomy for endometrial cancer). The majority of the patients had some degree of maceration of the dependent aspect of their pannus, and each patient expressed a desire for the reduction of her abdominal panniculus. Patient weight ranged from 52 kg to 175 kg (mean 106 kg) with a mean body mass index of 40.5 (range 21 to 62.3). Panniculectomies were performed in addition to vaginal or abdominal procedures; the average pannus weighed 4049 g (813 g to 12,000 g). The morbidity encountered was limited to five patients whose problems included a midline wound separation, a focal wound seroma, febrile morbidity (2 patients), and a nonfatal pulmonary embolus. Results: Patient satisfaction was assessed 4-12 months postoperatively by telephone interview. Ninety-two percent of the patients surveyed were very satisfied with the outcome and would still opt for the elective procedure retrospectively. We present the evaluation, surgical technique, postoperative management, and literature review of combining panniculectomy with gynecologic surgical procedures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19-24
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Pelvic Surgery
Volume3
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Abdominoplasty
Morbidity
Wounds and Injuries
Seroma
Vaginal Hysterectomy
Gynecologic Surgical Procedures
Plastic Surgery
Endometrial Neoplasms
Embolism
Hygiene
Hysterectomy
Gynecology
Patient Satisfaction
Ligaments
Body Mass Index
Fever
Obesity
Interviews
Weights and Measures
Lung

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Panniculectomy in the gynecologic and gynecologic oncology patient : Case Series and Literature Review. / Swisher, Eric D.; Pohl, Joseph F.; Taylor, Robert R.; Reed, Mark; Farnsworth, Lynn S.

In: Journal of Pelvic Surgery, Vol. 3, No. 1, 01.01.1997, p. 19-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Swisher, Eric D. ; Pohl, Joseph F. ; Taylor, Robert R. ; Reed, Mark ; Farnsworth, Lynn S. / Panniculectomy in the gynecologic and gynecologic oncology patient : Case Series and Literature Review. In: Journal of Pelvic Surgery. 1997 ; Vol. 3, No. 1. pp. 19-24.
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