Panniculectomy with simultaneous gynecologic oncology surgery

Todd Tillmanns, Scott A. Kamelle, Islam Abudayyeh, Scott D. McMeekin, Michael A. Gold, Thomas G. Korkos, Peter R. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. The objective was to report the utility and morbidity of panniculectomy in obese gynecologic oncology patients undergoing exploratory laparotomy. Methods. A retrospective chart review of 41 consecutive women who had a panniculectomy as part of an abdominal gynecologic oncology procedure between July 1996 and May 2000 was performed. Obese patients possessing a large pannus, the majority with a BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2, were included. Demographic, preoperative, operative, and postoperative data were obtained. Statistical analyses were performed using Statistical Analysis System (SAS) Version 6.13. Results. Panniculectomy was performed on 41 patients with a mean age of 55, weight of 126 kg, and BMI of 48 kg/m2. The most common comorbidities in this population were hypertension, diabetes, and osteoarthritis. Wound infection occurred in 4 (9.8%) patients; 88% of the patients received a hysterectomy. The average EBL was 358 cc. Operative time and length of hospital stay were on average 203 min and 5.5 days, respectively. A prior history of diabetes increased the risk of early complications (P = 0.03). Late complications were more likely to occur in older women (P = 0.05). Wound complications were increased in patients with larger BMI's (P = 0.05). Conclusions. This study supports the safety of the panniculectomy procedure in this high-risk group of morbidly obese patients for whom a technical advantage may be achieved by improved operative exposure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)518-522
Number of pages5
JournalGynecologic Oncology
Volume83
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Abdominoplasty
Gynecologic Surgical Procedures
Length of Stay
Wound Infection
Operative Time
Hysterectomy
Osteoarthritis
Laparotomy
Comorbidity
Demography
Hypertension
Morbidity
Safety
Weights and Measures
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Tillmanns, T., Kamelle, S. A., Abudayyeh, I., McMeekin, S. D., Gold, M. A., Korkos, T. G., & Johnson, P. R. (2001). Panniculectomy with simultaneous gynecologic oncology surgery. Gynecologic Oncology, 83(3), 518-522. https://doi.org/10.1006/gyno.2001.6414

Panniculectomy with simultaneous gynecologic oncology surgery. / Tillmanns, Todd; Kamelle, Scott A.; Abudayyeh, Islam; McMeekin, Scott D.; Gold, Michael A.; Korkos, Thomas G.; Johnson, Peter R.

In: Gynecologic Oncology, Vol. 83, No. 3, 01.01.2001, p. 518-522.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tillmanns, T, Kamelle, SA, Abudayyeh, I, McMeekin, SD, Gold, MA, Korkos, TG & Johnson, PR 2001, 'Panniculectomy with simultaneous gynecologic oncology surgery', Gynecologic Oncology, vol. 83, no. 3, pp. 518-522. https://doi.org/10.1006/gyno.2001.6414
Tillmanns T, Kamelle SA, Abudayyeh I, McMeekin SD, Gold MA, Korkos TG et al. Panniculectomy with simultaneous gynecologic oncology surgery. Gynecologic Oncology. 2001 Jan 1;83(3):518-522. https://doi.org/10.1006/gyno.2001.6414
Tillmanns, Todd ; Kamelle, Scott A. ; Abudayyeh, Islam ; McMeekin, Scott D. ; Gold, Michael A. ; Korkos, Thomas G. ; Johnson, Peter R. / Panniculectomy with simultaneous gynecologic oncology surgery. In: Gynecologic Oncology. 2001 ; Vol. 83, No. 3. pp. 518-522.
@article{7f7420417a9a4419a76ab8f0b75b5a2a,
title = "Panniculectomy with simultaneous gynecologic oncology surgery",
abstract = "Objective. The objective was to report the utility and morbidity of panniculectomy in obese gynecologic oncology patients undergoing exploratory laparotomy. Methods. A retrospective chart review of 41 consecutive women who had a panniculectomy as part of an abdominal gynecologic oncology procedure between July 1996 and May 2000 was performed. Obese patients possessing a large pannus, the majority with a BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2, were included. Demographic, preoperative, operative, and postoperative data were obtained. Statistical analyses were performed using Statistical Analysis System (SAS) Version 6.13. Results. Panniculectomy was performed on 41 patients with a mean age of 55, weight of 126 kg, and BMI of 48 kg/m2. The most common comorbidities in this population were hypertension, diabetes, and osteoarthritis. Wound infection occurred in 4 (9.8{\%}) patients; 88{\%} of the patients received a hysterectomy. The average EBL was 358 cc. Operative time and length of hospital stay were on average 203 min and 5.5 days, respectively. A prior history of diabetes increased the risk of early complications (P = 0.03). Late complications were more likely to occur in older women (P = 0.05). Wound complications were increased in patients with larger BMI's (P = 0.05). Conclusions. This study supports the safety of the panniculectomy procedure in this high-risk group of morbidly obese patients for whom a technical advantage may be achieved by improved operative exposure.",
author = "Todd Tillmanns and Kamelle, {Scott A.} and Islam Abudayyeh and McMeekin, {Scott D.} and Gold, {Michael A.} and Korkos, {Thomas G.} and Johnson, {Peter R.}",
year = "2001",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1006/gyno.2001.6414",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "83",
pages = "518--522",
journal = "Gynecologic Oncology",
issn = "0090-8258",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Panniculectomy with simultaneous gynecologic oncology surgery

AU - Tillmanns, Todd

AU - Kamelle, Scott A.

AU - Abudayyeh, Islam

AU - McMeekin, Scott D.

AU - Gold, Michael A.

AU - Korkos, Thomas G.

AU - Johnson, Peter R.

PY - 2001/1/1

Y1 - 2001/1/1

N2 - Objective. The objective was to report the utility and morbidity of panniculectomy in obese gynecologic oncology patients undergoing exploratory laparotomy. Methods. A retrospective chart review of 41 consecutive women who had a panniculectomy as part of an abdominal gynecologic oncology procedure between July 1996 and May 2000 was performed. Obese patients possessing a large pannus, the majority with a BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2, were included. Demographic, preoperative, operative, and postoperative data were obtained. Statistical analyses were performed using Statistical Analysis System (SAS) Version 6.13. Results. Panniculectomy was performed on 41 patients with a mean age of 55, weight of 126 kg, and BMI of 48 kg/m2. The most common comorbidities in this population were hypertension, diabetes, and osteoarthritis. Wound infection occurred in 4 (9.8%) patients; 88% of the patients received a hysterectomy. The average EBL was 358 cc. Operative time and length of hospital stay were on average 203 min and 5.5 days, respectively. A prior history of diabetes increased the risk of early complications (P = 0.03). Late complications were more likely to occur in older women (P = 0.05). Wound complications were increased in patients with larger BMI's (P = 0.05). Conclusions. This study supports the safety of the panniculectomy procedure in this high-risk group of morbidly obese patients for whom a technical advantage may be achieved by improved operative exposure.

AB - Objective. The objective was to report the utility and morbidity of panniculectomy in obese gynecologic oncology patients undergoing exploratory laparotomy. Methods. A retrospective chart review of 41 consecutive women who had a panniculectomy as part of an abdominal gynecologic oncology procedure between July 1996 and May 2000 was performed. Obese patients possessing a large pannus, the majority with a BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2, were included. Demographic, preoperative, operative, and postoperative data were obtained. Statistical analyses were performed using Statistical Analysis System (SAS) Version 6.13. Results. Panniculectomy was performed on 41 patients with a mean age of 55, weight of 126 kg, and BMI of 48 kg/m2. The most common comorbidities in this population were hypertension, diabetes, and osteoarthritis. Wound infection occurred in 4 (9.8%) patients; 88% of the patients received a hysterectomy. The average EBL was 358 cc. Operative time and length of hospital stay were on average 203 min and 5.5 days, respectively. A prior history of diabetes increased the risk of early complications (P = 0.03). Late complications were more likely to occur in older women (P = 0.05). Wound complications were increased in patients with larger BMI's (P = 0.05). Conclusions. This study supports the safety of the panniculectomy procedure in this high-risk group of morbidly obese patients for whom a technical advantage may be achieved by improved operative exposure.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035209424&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035209424&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1006/gyno.2001.6414

DO - 10.1006/gyno.2001.6414

M3 - Article

VL - 83

SP - 518

EP - 522

JO - Gynecologic Oncology

JF - Gynecologic Oncology

SN - 0090-8258

IS - 3

ER -