Parallel optical control of spatiotemporal neuronal spike activity using high-speed digital light processing

Jason Jerome, Robert Foehring, William Armstrong, William J. Spain, Detlef Heck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neurons in the mammalian neocortex receive inputs from and communicate back to thousands of other neurons, creating complex spatiotemporal activity patterns. The experimental investigation of these parallel dynamic interactions has been limited due to the technical challenges of monitoring or manipulating neuronal activity at that level of complexity. Here we describe a new massively parallel photostimulation system that can be used to control action potential fring in in vitro brain slices with high spatial and temporal resolution while performing extracellular or intracellular electrophysiological measurements. The system uses digital light processing technology to generate 2-dimensional (2D) stimulus patterns with >780,000 independently controlled photostimulation sites that operate at high spatial (5.4 μm) and temporal (>13 kHz) resolution. Light is projected through the quartz-glass bottom of the perfusion chamber providing access to a large area (2.76 mm × 2.07 mm) of the slice preparation. This system has the unique capability to induce temporally precise action potential fring in large groups of neurons distributed over a wide area covering several cortical columns. Parallel photostimulation opens up new opportunities for the in vitro experimental investigation of spatiotemporal neuronal interactions at a broad range of anatomical scales.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number70
JournalFrontiers in Systems Neuroscience
Issue numberAUGUST 2011
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 25 2011

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Neurons
Light
Action Potentials
Quartz
Neocortex
Glass
Perfusion
Technology
Brain
In Vitro Techniques

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Developmental Neuroscience

Cite this

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