Parastomal pyoderma gangrenosum

A case report and literature review

Gregory Mancini, Lennis Floyd, Julio A. Solla

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Parastomal pyoderma gangrenosum (PPG) is an exceedingly rare disease process most often observed in inflammatory bowel disease patients with an ileostomy. Fewer than 50 cases have been reported in the medical literature. The incidence is 0.6 per cent of patients with ileostomy and inflammatory bowel disease. The rarity of the disease leads to misdiagnosis and mistreatment of the lesion. The intense pain and disruption of ostomy function greatly impair affected individuals beyond the limit of their underlying disease. Current best care practices observed in small study series indicate long-term intensive medical therapy aimed at systemic disease suppression to optimize PPG wound healing. Our patient had no signs of active Crohn disease at the time of PPG presentation. She was initially treated with minimal wound debridement and intralesional triamcinolone. Finally under the care of an enterostomal/wound care therapist the patient achieved excellent PPG resolution in 6 months.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)824-826
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume68
Issue number9
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pyoderma Gangrenosum
Ileostomy
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Ostomy
Triamcinolone
Wounds and Injuries
Debridement
Rare Diseases
Diagnostic Errors
Practice Guidelines
Crohn Disease
Wound Healing
Patient Care
Pain
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Parastomal pyoderma gangrenosum : A case report and literature review. / Mancini, Gregory; Floyd, Lennis; Solla, Julio A.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 68, No. 9, 01.12.2002, p. 824-826.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Mancini, G, Floyd, L & Solla, JA 2002, 'Parastomal pyoderma gangrenosum: A case report and literature review', American Surgeon, vol. 68, no. 9, pp. 824-826.
Mancini, Gregory ; Floyd, Lennis ; Solla, Julio A. / Parastomal pyoderma gangrenosum : A case report and literature review. In: American Surgeon. 2002 ; Vol. 68, No. 9. pp. 824-826.
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