Parent caregiving choices of middle-generation Blacks and Whites in the United States

Shelley White-Means, Rose M. Rubin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study compares how middle-generation caregivers and non-caregivers differ by race and explores racial differences in activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), and financial assistance that middle-generation caregivers provide for their parents. Method: Using 2000 Health and Retirement Study data, racially stratified descriptive analyses and logistic regression models for ADL, IADL, and financial assistance are presented. Results: Parental need and race influence support, with similar patterns of Black and White ADL support, but racial differences in IADL and financial support. Having more children motivates Whites to increase IADL support and reduce financial support; more children decreases Blacks' IADL support. Sibling caregiver networks influence IADL and financial support in ways that vary by race. The number employed is a key determinant for Blacks for all support, but only influences White ADL support. Discussion: The findings of this article indicate the importance of sample stratification by race and that employment or other subsidies may aid the expansion of caregiving by middle-generation adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)560-582
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2008

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caregiving
Activities of Daily Living
parents
Financial Support
caregiver
financial assistance
Caregivers
hydroquinone
Logistic Models
retirement
Retirement
subsidy
logistics
Siblings
determinants
regression
Parents

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

Parent caregiving choices of middle-generation Blacks and Whites in the United States. / White-Means, Shelley; Rubin, Rose M.

In: Journal of Aging and Health, Vol. 20, No. 5, 01.08.2008, p. 560-582.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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