Parental recognition of overweight in school-age children

Delia S. West, James M. Raczynski, Martha M. Phillips, Zoran Bursac, C. Heath Gauss, Brooke E.E. Montgomery

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective:Examine the accuracy of parental weight perceptions of overweight children before and after the implementation of childhood obesity legislation that included BMI screening and feedback.Methods and Procedures:Statewide telephone surveys of parents of overweight (BMI 85th percentile) Arkansas public school children before (n 1,551; 15 African American) and after (n 2,508; 15 African American) policy implementation were examined for correspondence between parental perception of child's weight and objective classification.Results:Most (60) parents of overweight children underestimated weight at baseline. Parents of younger children were significantly more likely to underestimate (65) than parents of adolescents (51). Overweight parents were not more likely to underestimate, nor was inaccuracy associated with parental education or socioeconomic status. African-American parents were twice as likely to underestimate as whites. One year after BMI screening and feedback was implemented, the accuracy of classification of overweight children improved (53 underestimation). African-American parents had significantly greater improvements than white parents (P < 0.0001).Discussion:Parental recognition of childhood overweight may be improved with BMI screening and feedback, and African-American parents may specifically benefit. Nonetheless, underestimation of overweight is common and may have implications for public health interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)630-636
Number of pages7
JournalObesity
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2008

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Parents
African Americans
Weight Perception
Recognition (Psychology)
Pediatric Obesity
Legislation
Telephone
Social Class
Public Health
Education
Weights and Measures

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

West, D. S., Raczynski, J. M., Phillips, M. M., Bursac, Z., Heath Gauss, C., & Montgomery, B. E. E. (2008). Parental recognition of overweight in school-age children. Obesity, 16(3), 630-636. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2007.108

Parental recognition of overweight in school-age children. / West, Delia S.; Raczynski, James M.; Phillips, Martha M.; Bursac, Zoran; Heath Gauss, C.; Montgomery, Brooke E.E.

In: Obesity, Vol. 16, No. 3, 01.03.2008, p. 630-636.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

West, DS, Raczynski, JM, Phillips, MM, Bursac, Z, Heath Gauss, C & Montgomery, BEE 2008, 'Parental recognition of overweight in school-age children', Obesity, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 630-636. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2007.108
West DS, Raczynski JM, Phillips MM, Bursac Z, Heath Gauss C, Montgomery BEE. Parental recognition of overweight in school-age children. Obesity. 2008 Mar 1;16(3):630-636. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2007.108
West, Delia S. ; Raczynski, James M. ; Phillips, Martha M. ; Bursac, Zoran ; Heath Gauss, C. ; Montgomery, Brooke E.E. / Parental recognition of overweight in school-age children. In: Obesity. 2008 ; Vol. 16, No. 3. pp. 630-636.
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