Parenting a child with an autism spectrum disorder: Public perceptions and parental conceptualizations

Susan L. Neely-Barnes, Heather R. Hall, Ruth J. Roberts, Joyce Graff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the middle part of the 20th century, parents were frequently blamed for causing autism. Although this idea is no longer prevalent in professional circles, this qualitative study indicates that parents still experience blame from community members and extended family. Eleven parents of children with autism participated in two focus groups. This qualitative study examined themes of parent blame as well as parents' own conceptualizations of autism. Results indicate that parents experienced blame for their children's autism-related behavior from the public and extended family, but most parents viewed the child with autism in positive ways.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)208-225
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Family Social Work
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2011

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autism
parents
extended family
public
family
community
experience
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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Development
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Parenting a child with an autism spectrum disorder : Public perceptions and parental conceptualizations. / Neely-Barnes, Susan L.; Hall, Heather R.; Roberts, Ruth J.; Graff, Joyce.

In: Journal of Family Social Work, Vol. 14, No. 3, 01.05.2011, p. 208-225.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Neely-Barnes, Susan L. ; Hall, Heather R. ; Roberts, Ruth J. ; Graff, Joyce. / Parenting a child with an autism spectrum disorder : Public perceptions and parental conceptualizations. In: Journal of Family Social Work. 2011 ; Vol. 14, No. 3. pp. 208-225.
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