Pass the popcorn

"obesogenic" behaviors and stigma in children's movies

Elizabeth M. Throop, Asheley Cockrell Skinner, Andrew J. Perrin, Michael J. Steiner, Adebowale Odulana, Eliana M. Perrin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To determine the prevalence of obesity-related behaviors and attitudes in children's movies. Methods A mixed-methods study of the top-grossing G- and PG-rated movies, 2006-2010 (4 per year) was performed. For each 10-min movie segment, the following were assessed: 1) prevalence of key nutrition and physical activity behaviors corresponding to the American Academy of Pediatrics obesity prevention recommendations for families; 2) prevalence of weight stigma; 3) assessment as healthy, unhealthy, or neutral; 3) free-text interpretations of stigma. Results Agreement between coders was >85% (Cohen's kappa = 0.7), good for binary responses. Segments with food depicted: exaggerated portion size (26%); unhealthy snacks (51%); sugar-sweetened beverages (19%). Screen time was also prevalent (40% of movies showed television; 35% computer; 20% video games). Unhealthy segments outnumbered healthy segments 2:1. Most (70%) of the movies included weight-related stigmatizing content (e.g., "That fat butt! Flabby arms! And this ridiculous belly!"). Conclusions These popular children's movies had significant "obesogenic" content, and most contained weight-based stigma. They present a mixed message to children, promoting unhealthy behaviors while stigmatizing the behaviors' possible effects. Further research is needed to determine the effects of such messages on children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1694-1700
Number of pages7
JournalObesity
Volume22
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Motion Pictures
Weights and Measures
Portion Size
Video Games
Snacks
Pediatric Obesity
Beverages
Television
Obesity
Fats
Exercise
Food
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Throop, E. M., Skinner, A. C., Perrin, A. J., Steiner, M. J., Odulana, A., & Perrin, E. M. (2014). Pass the popcorn: "obesogenic" behaviors and stigma in children's movies. Obesity, 22(7), 1694-1700. https://doi.org/10.1002/oby.20652

Pass the popcorn : "obesogenic" behaviors and stigma in children's movies. / Throop, Elizabeth M.; Skinner, Asheley Cockrell; Perrin, Andrew J.; Steiner, Michael J.; Odulana, Adebowale; Perrin, Eliana M.

In: Obesity, Vol. 22, No. 7, 01.01.2014, p. 1694-1700.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Throop, EM, Skinner, AC, Perrin, AJ, Steiner, MJ, Odulana, A & Perrin, EM 2014, 'Pass the popcorn: "obesogenic" behaviors and stigma in children's movies', Obesity, vol. 22, no. 7, pp. 1694-1700. https://doi.org/10.1002/oby.20652
Throop EM, Skinner AC, Perrin AJ, Steiner MJ, Odulana A, Perrin EM. Pass the popcorn: "obesogenic" behaviors and stigma in children's movies. Obesity. 2014 Jan 1;22(7):1694-1700. https://doi.org/10.1002/oby.20652
Throop, Elizabeth M. ; Skinner, Asheley Cockrell ; Perrin, Andrew J. ; Steiner, Michael J. ; Odulana, Adebowale ; Perrin, Eliana M. / Pass the popcorn : "obesogenic" behaviors and stigma in children's movies. In: Obesity. 2014 ; Vol. 22, No. 7. pp. 1694-1700.
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