Pathogenic human coronavirus infections

causes and consequences of cytokine storm and immunopathology

Rudragouda Channappanavar, Stanley Perlman

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human coronaviruses (hCoVs) can be divided into low pathogenic and highly pathogenic coronaviruses. The low pathogenic CoVs infect the upper respiratory tract and cause mild, cold-like respiratory illness. In contrast, highly pathogenic hCoVs such as severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome CoV (MERS-CoV) predominantly infect lower airways and cause fatal pneumonia. Severe pneumonia caused by pathogenic hCoVs is often associated with rapid virus replication, massive inflammatory cell infiltration and elevated pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine responses resulting in acute lung injury (ALI), and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Recent studies in experimentally infected animal strongly suggest a crucial role for virus-induced immunopathological events in causing fatal pneumonia after hCoV infections. Here we review the current understanding of how a dysregulated immune response may cause lung immunopathology leading to deleterious clinical manifestations after pathogenic hCoV infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)529-539
Number of pages11
JournalSeminars in Immunopathology
Volume39
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

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Coronavirus Infections
Coronavirus
Cytokines
Pneumonia
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome
Acute Lung Injury
Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Virus Replication
Infection
Chemokines
Respiratory System
Viruses
Lung

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Pathogenic human coronavirus infections : causes and consequences of cytokine storm and immunopathology. / Channappanavar, Rudragouda; Perlman, Stanley.

In: Seminars in Immunopathology, Vol. 39, No. 5, 01.07.2017, p. 529-539.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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