Patient and physician perspectives on the use of cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion 0.05% for the management of chronic dry eye

Tatiana Deveney, Penny Asbell

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Dry eye disease (DED) is a multifactorial disease of the ocular surface and is one of the most common reasons for patients to visit an eye care provider. Cyclosporine A (CsA) is an immune modulating drug that was approved in the US for topical use in the treatment of DED in 2003, which led to a paradigm change in our understanding and treatment of DED, turning attention to control of inflammation for treatment. This review summarizes the literature to date regarding the impact of CsA on the treatment of DED. A special focus is given to the patient and physician perspectives of CsA, including dry eye symptom improvement, medication side effects, and overall patient satisfaction. Studies evaluating CsA in DED have considerable heterogeneity making generalized conclusions about the effect of CsA difficult. However, most studies have demonstrated improvement in at least some symptoms of dry eye in CsA-treated patients. Side effects, most commonly ocular burning on administration of CsA, are common. The literature is sparse regarding long-term follow-up of patients treated with CsA, optimal duration of treatment, and identifying which patients may receive the most benefit from CsA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)569-576
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Ophthalmology
Volume12
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 23 2018

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Emulsions
Cyclosporine
Physicians
Eye Diseases
Therapeutics
Patient Satisfaction
Inflammation
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Patient and physician perspectives on the use of cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion 0.05% for the management of chronic dry eye. / Deveney, Tatiana; Asbell, Penny.

In: Clinical Ophthalmology, Vol. 12, 23.03.2018, p. 569-576.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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abstract = "Dry eye disease (DED) is a multifactorial disease of the ocular surface and is one of the most common reasons for patients to visit an eye care provider. Cyclosporine A (CsA) is an immune modulating drug that was approved in the US for topical use in the treatment of DED in 2003, which led to a paradigm change in our understanding and treatment of DED, turning attention to control of inflammation for treatment. This review summarizes the literature to date regarding the impact of CsA on the treatment of DED. A special focus is given to the patient and physician perspectives of CsA, including dry eye symptom improvement, medication side effects, and overall patient satisfaction. Studies evaluating CsA in DED have considerable heterogeneity making generalized conclusions about the effect of CsA difficult. However, most studies have demonstrated improvement in at least some symptoms of dry eye in CsA-treated patients. Side effects, most commonly ocular burning on administration of CsA, are common. The literature is sparse regarding long-term follow-up of patients treated with CsA, optimal duration of treatment, and identifying which patients may receive the most benefit from CsA.",
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