Patient education level affects functionality and long term mortality after major lower extremity amputation

Michael R. Corey, Jamii St. Julien, Carly Miller, Bryan Fisher, Sara L. Cederstrand, William A. Nylander, Raul J. Guzman, Jeffery Dattilo

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    8 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between patient education level and 5-year mortality after major lower extremity amputation. Methods: The records of all patients who underwent above-knee or below-knee amputation at the Nashville Veterans Affairs Medical Center by the vascular surgery service between January 2000 and August 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. Formal levels of education of the study patients were recorded. Outcomes were compared between those patients who had completed high school and those who had not. Bivariate analysis using χ2 and Student's t tests and multivariate logistic regression were performed. Results: Five-year mortality for patients who had completed high school was lower than for those who had not completed high school (62.6% vs 84.3%, P =.001), even after adjusting for important clinical factors (odds ratio for death,.377; 95% confidence interval,.164-.868; P =.022). Conclusion: Patients with less education have increased long-term mortality after lower extremity amputation.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)626-630
    Number of pages5
    JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
    Volume204
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

    Fingerprint

    Patient Education
    Amputation
    Lower Extremity
    Mortality
    Knee
    Veterans
    Blood Vessels
    Logistic Models
    Odds Ratio
    Confidence Intervals
    Students
    Education

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Surgery

    Cite this

    Corey, M. R., St. Julien, J., Miller, C., Fisher, B., Cederstrand, S. L., Nylander, W. A., ... Dattilo, J. (2012). Patient education level affects functionality and long term mortality after major lower extremity amputation. American Journal of Surgery, 204(5), 626-630. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2012.07.018

    Patient education level affects functionality and long term mortality after major lower extremity amputation. / Corey, Michael R.; St. Julien, Jamii; Miller, Carly; Fisher, Bryan; Cederstrand, Sara L.; Nylander, William A.; Guzman, Raul J.; Dattilo, Jeffery.

    In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 204, No. 5, 01.01.2012, p. 626-630.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Corey, MR, St. Julien, J, Miller, C, Fisher, B, Cederstrand, SL, Nylander, WA, Guzman, RJ & Dattilo, J 2012, 'Patient education level affects functionality and long term mortality after major lower extremity amputation', American Journal of Surgery, vol. 204, no. 5, pp. 626-630. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2012.07.018
    Corey, Michael R. ; St. Julien, Jamii ; Miller, Carly ; Fisher, Bryan ; Cederstrand, Sara L. ; Nylander, William A. ; Guzman, Raul J. ; Dattilo, Jeffery. / Patient education level affects functionality and long term mortality after major lower extremity amputation. In: American Journal of Surgery. 2012 ; Vol. 204, No. 5. pp. 626-630.
    @article{73ce8770a3714630b7acdaef46f90f27,
    title = "Patient education level affects functionality and long term mortality after major lower extremity amputation",
    abstract = "Background: The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between patient education level and 5-year mortality after major lower extremity amputation. Methods: The records of all patients who underwent above-knee or below-knee amputation at the Nashville Veterans Affairs Medical Center by the vascular surgery service between January 2000 and August 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. Formal levels of education of the study patients were recorded. Outcomes were compared between those patients who had completed high school and those who had not. Bivariate analysis using χ2 and Student's t tests and multivariate logistic regression were performed. Results: Five-year mortality for patients who had completed high school was lower than for those who had not completed high school (62.6{\%} vs 84.3{\%}, P =.001), even after adjusting for important clinical factors (odds ratio for death,.377; 95{\%} confidence interval,.164-.868; P =.022). Conclusion: Patients with less education have increased long-term mortality after lower extremity amputation.",
    author = "Corey, {Michael R.} and {St. Julien}, Jamii and Carly Miller and Bryan Fisher and Cederstrand, {Sara L.} and Nylander, {William A.} and Guzman, {Raul J.} and Jeffery Dattilo",
    year = "2012",
    month = "1",
    day = "1",
    doi = "10.1016/j.amjsurg.2012.07.018",
    language = "English (US)",
    volume = "204",
    pages = "626--630",
    journal = "American Journal of Surgery",
    issn = "0002-9610",
    publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
    number = "5",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Patient education level affects functionality and long term mortality after major lower extremity amputation

    AU - Corey, Michael R.

    AU - St. Julien, Jamii

    AU - Miller, Carly

    AU - Fisher, Bryan

    AU - Cederstrand, Sara L.

    AU - Nylander, William A.

    AU - Guzman, Raul J.

    AU - Dattilo, Jeffery

    PY - 2012/1/1

    Y1 - 2012/1/1

    N2 - Background: The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between patient education level and 5-year mortality after major lower extremity amputation. Methods: The records of all patients who underwent above-knee or below-knee amputation at the Nashville Veterans Affairs Medical Center by the vascular surgery service between January 2000 and August 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. Formal levels of education of the study patients were recorded. Outcomes were compared between those patients who had completed high school and those who had not. Bivariate analysis using χ2 and Student's t tests and multivariate logistic regression were performed. Results: Five-year mortality for patients who had completed high school was lower than for those who had not completed high school (62.6% vs 84.3%, P =.001), even after adjusting for important clinical factors (odds ratio for death,.377; 95% confidence interval,.164-.868; P =.022). Conclusion: Patients with less education have increased long-term mortality after lower extremity amputation.

    AB - Background: The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between patient education level and 5-year mortality after major lower extremity amputation. Methods: The records of all patients who underwent above-knee or below-knee amputation at the Nashville Veterans Affairs Medical Center by the vascular surgery service between January 2000 and August 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. Formal levels of education of the study patients were recorded. Outcomes were compared between those patients who had completed high school and those who had not. Bivariate analysis using χ2 and Student's t tests and multivariate logistic regression were performed. Results: Five-year mortality for patients who had completed high school was lower than for those who had not completed high school (62.6% vs 84.3%, P =.001), even after adjusting for important clinical factors (odds ratio for death,.377; 95% confidence interval,.164-.868; P =.022). Conclusion: Patients with less education have increased long-term mortality after lower extremity amputation.

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84868541104&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84868541104&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2012.07.018

    DO - 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2012.07.018

    M3 - Article

    VL - 204

    SP - 626

    EP - 630

    JO - American Journal of Surgery

    JF - American Journal of Surgery

    SN - 0002-9610

    IS - 5

    ER -