Patient navigation as a model to increase participation of African Americans in cancer clinical trials

Mona N. Fouad, Aras Acemgil, Sejong Bae, Andres Forero, Nedra Lisovicz, Michelle Martin, Gabriela R. Oates, Edward E. Partridge, Selwyn M. Vickers

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose Less than 10% of patients enrolled in clinical trials are minorities. The patient navigation model has been used to improve access to medical care but has not been evaluated as a tool to increase the participation of minorities in clinical trials. The Increasing Minority Participation in Clinical Trials project used patient navigators (PNs) to enhance the recruitment of African Americans for and their retention in therapeutic cancer clinical trials in a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center. Methods Lay individuals were hired and trained to serve as PNs for clinical trials. African Americanpatients potentially eligible for clinical trials were identified through chart review or referrals by clinic nurses, physicians, and social workers. PNs provided two levels of services: education about clinical trials and tailored support for patients who enrolled in clinical trials. ResultsBetween 2007 and 2014, 424 African American patients with cancer were referred to the Increasing Minority Participation in Clinical Trials project. Of those eligible for a clinical trial (N = 378), 304 (80.4%) enrolled in a trial and 272 (72%) consented to receive patient navigation support. Of those receiving patient navigation support, 74.5% completed the trial, compared with 37.5% of those not receiving patient navigation support. The difference in retention rates between the two groups was statistically significant (P,.001). Participation of African Americans in therapeutic cancer clinical trials increased from 9% to 16%. Conclusion Patient navigation for clinical trials successfully retained African Americans in therapeutic trials compared with non-patient navigation trial participation. The model holdspromise as a strategy to reduce disparities in cancer clinical trial participation. Future studies should evaluate it with racial/ethnic minorities across cancer centers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)556-563
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Oncology Practice
Volume12
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

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Patient Navigation
African Americans
Clinical Trials
Neoplasms
National Cancer Institute (U.S.)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Oncology(nursing)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Patient navigation as a model to increase participation of African Americans in cancer clinical trials. / Fouad, Mona N.; Acemgil, Aras; Bae, Sejong; Forero, Andres; Lisovicz, Nedra; Martin, Michelle; Oates, Gabriela R.; Partridge, Edward E.; Vickers, Selwyn M.

In: Journal of Oncology Practice, Vol. 12, No. 6, 01.06.2016, p. 556-563.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Fouad, MN, Acemgil, A, Bae, S, Forero, A, Lisovicz, N, Martin, M, Oates, GR, Partridge, EE & Vickers, SM 2016, 'Patient navigation as a model to increase participation of African Americans in cancer clinical trials', Journal of Oncology Practice, vol. 12, no. 6, pp. 556-563. https://doi.org/10.1200/JOP.2015.008946
Fouad, Mona N. ; Acemgil, Aras ; Bae, Sejong ; Forero, Andres ; Lisovicz, Nedra ; Martin, Michelle ; Oates, Gabriela R. ; Partridge, Edward E. ; Vickers, Selwyn M. / Patient navigation as a model to increase participation of African Americans in cancer clinical trials. In: Journal of Oncology Practice. 2016 ; Vol. 12, No. 6. pp. 556-563.
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abstract = "Purpose Less than 10{\%} of patients enrolled in clinical trials are minorities. The patient navigation model has been used to improve access to medical care but has not been evaluated as a tool to increase the participation of minorities in clinical trials. The Increasing Minority Participation in Clinical Trials project used patient navigators (PNs) to enhance the recruitment of African Americans for and their retention in therapeutic cancer clinical trials in a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center. Methods Lay individuals were hired and trained to serve as PNs for clinical trials. African Americanpatients potentially eligible for clinical trials were identified through chart review or referrals by clinic nurses, physicians, and social workers. PNs provided two levels of services: education about clinical trials and tailored support for patients who enrolled in clinical trials. ResultsBetween 2007 and 2014, 424 African American patients with cancer were referred to the Increasing Minority Participation in Clinical Trials project. Of those eligible for a clinical trial (N = 378), 304 (80.4{\%}) enrolled in a trial and 272 (72{\%}) consented to receive patient navigation support. Of those receiving patient navigation support, 74.5{\%} completed the trial, compared with 37.5{\%} of those not receiving patient navigation support. The difference in retention rates between the two groups was statistically significant (P,.001). Participation of African Americans in therapeutic cancer clinical trials increased from 9{\%} to 16{\%}. Conclusion Patient navigation for clinical trials successfully retained African Americans in therapeutic trials compared with non-patient navigation trial participation. The model holdspromise as a strategy to reduce disparities in cancer clinical trial participation. Future studies should evaluate it with racial/ethnic minorities across cancer centers.",
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AU - Martin, Michelle

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N2 - Purpose Less than 10% of patients enrolled in clinical trials are minorities. The patient navigation model has been used to improve access to medical care but has not been evaluated as a tool to increase the participation of minorities in clinical trials. The Increasing Minority Participation in Clinical Trials project used patient navigators (PNs) to enhance the recruitment of African Americans for and their retention in therapeutic cancer clinical trials in a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center. Methods Lay individuals were hired and trained to serve as PNs for clinical trials. African Americanpatients potentially eligible for clinical trials were identified through chart review or referrals by clinic nurses, physicians, and social workers. PNs provided two levels of services: education about clinical trials and tailored support for patients who enrolled in clinical trials. ResultsBetween 2007 and 2014, 424 African American patients with cancer were referred to the Increasing Minority Participation in Clinical Trials project. Of those eligible for a clinical trial (N = 378), 304 (80.4%) enrolled in a trial and 272 (72%) consented to receive patient navigation support. Of those receiving patient navigation support, 74.5% completed the trial, compared with 37.5% of those not receiving patient navigation support. The difference in retention rates between the two groups was statistically significant (P,.001). Participation of African Americans in therapeutic cancer clinical trials increased from 9% to 16%. Conclusion Patient navigation for clinical trials successfully retained African Americans in therapeutic trials compared with non-patient navigation trial participation. The model holdspromise as a strategy to reduce disparities in cancer clinical trial participation. Future studies should evaluate it with racial/ethnic minorities across cancer centers.

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