Patient safety

Where is nursing education?

David M. Gregory, Lorna W. Guse, Diana Davidson Dick, Cynthia Russell

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    38 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Patient safety is receiving unprecedented attention among clinicians, researchers, and managers in health care systems. In particular, the focus is on the magnitude of systems-based errors and the urgency to identify and prevent these errors. In this new era of patient safety, attending to errors, adverse events, and near misses warrants consideration of both active (individual) and latent (system) errors. However, it is the exclusive focus on individual errors, and not system errors, that is of concern regarding nursing education and patient safety. Educators are encouraged to engage in a culture shift whereby student error is considered from an education systems perspective. Educators and schools are challenged to look within and systematically review how program structures and processes may be contributing to student error and undermining patient safety. Under the rubric of patient safety, the authors also encourage educators to address discontinuities between the educational and practice sectors.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)79-82
    Number of pages4
    JournalJournal of Nursing Education
    Volume46
    Issue number2
    StatePublished - Feb 1 2007

    Fingerprint

    Nursing Education
    Patient Safety
    nursing
    education
    Students
    educator
    Patient Education
    Research Personnel
    Delivery of Health Care
    Education
    education system
    student
    manager
    health care
    event
    school

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Nursing(all)
    • Education

    Cite this

    Gregory, D. M., Guse, L. W., Dick, D. D., & Russell, C. (2007). Patient safety: Where is nursing education? Journal of Nursing Education, 46(2), 79-82.

    Patient safety : Where is nursing education? / Gregory, David M.; Guse, Lorna W.; Dick, Diana Davidson; Russell, Cynthia.

    In: Journal of Nursing Education, Vol. 46, No. 2, 01.02.2007, p. 79-82.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Gregory, DM, Guse, LW, Dick, DD & Russell, C 2007, 'Patient safety: Where is nursing education?', Journal of Nursing Education, vol. 46, no. 2, pp. 79-82.
    Gregory DM, Guse LW, Dick DD, Russell C. Patient safety: Where is nursing education? Journal of Nursing Education. 2007 Feb 1;46(2):79-82.
    Gregory, David M. ; Guse, Lorna W. ; Dick, Diana Davidson ; Russell, Cynthia. / Patient safety : Where is nursing education?. In: Journal of Nursing Education. 2007 ; Vol. 46, No. 2. pp. 79-82.
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