Patterns of Breaks in Umbilical Cords by Different Mechanisms

Samantha R. Evans, Darinka Mileusnic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Investigations of perinatal deaths often result in discrepancies between autopsy findings and witness accounts. The mechanism by which the umbilical cord is severed after delivery is a common quandary. Confirming or refuting the mother's stated method frequently has significant investigative importance; however, a surprising paucity of data currently exists to allow an objective opinion about the likely mechanism. Ninety-nine placentas with umbilical cords were examined. By random selection, each cord was severed by one of the following tools or mechanisms: knives, scissors, traction, or crush. Each break was examined and photographed, and a tissue section from the broken end examined microscopically. Differentiation of mechanism was best done grossly based on specific pattern recognition. Umbilical cords severed by blunt force have distinctly different morphology from those severed by sharp force. Even similar-appearing sharp force transections frequently have mechanism-specific distinctive patterns of injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1222-1225
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Forensic Sciences
Volume57
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Umbilical Cord
Traction
Placenta
Autopsy
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Genetics

Cite this

Patterns of Breaks in Umbilical Cords by Different Mechanisms. / Evans, Samantha R.; Mileusnic, Darinka.

In: Journal of Forensic Sciences, Vol. 57, No. 5, 01.09.2012, p. 1222-1225.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{8919806271ea44f29d7c7e1d30954a13,
title = "Patterns of Breaks in Umbilical Cords by Different Mechanisms",
abstract = "Investigations of perinatal deaths often result in discrepancies between autopsy findings and witness accounts. The mechanism by which the umbilical cord is severed after delivery is a common quandary. Confirming or refuting the mother's stated method frequently has significant investigative importance; however, a surprising paucity of data currently exists to allow an objective opinion about the likely mechanism. Ninety-nine placentas with umbilical cords were examined. By random selection, each cord was severed by one of the following tools or mechanisms: knives, scissors, traction, or crush. Each break was examined and photographed, and a tissue section from the broken end examined microscopically. Differentiation of mechanism was best done grossly based on specific pattern recognition. Umbilical cords severed by blunt force have distinctly different morphology from those severed by sharp force. Even similar-appearing sharp force transections frequently have mechanism-specific distinctive patterns of injury.",
author = "Evans, {Samantha R.} and Darinka Mileusnic",
year = "2012",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1556-4029.2012.02116.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "57",
pages = "1222--1225",
journal = "Journal of Forensic Sciences",
issn = "0022-1198",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patterns of Breaks in Umbilical Cords by Different Mechanisms

AU - Evans, Samantha R.

AU - Mileusnic, Darinka

PY - 2012/9/1

Y1 - 2012/9/1

N2 - Investigations of perinatal deaths often result in discrepancies between autopsy findings and witness accounts. The mechanism by which the umbilical cord is severed after delivery is a common quandary. Confirming or refuting the mother's stated method frequently has significant investigative importance; however, a surprising paucity of data currently exists to allow an objective opinion about the likely mechanism. Ninety-nine placentas with umbilical cords were examined. By random selection, each cord was severed by one of the following tools or mechanisms: knives, scissors, traction, or crush. Each break was examined and photographed, and a tissue section from the broken end examined microscopically. Differentiation of mechanism was best done grossly based on specific pattern recognition. Umbilical cords severed by blunt force have distinctly different morphology from those severed by sharp force. Even similar-appearing sharp force transections frequently have mechanism-specific distinctive patterns of injury.

AB - Investigations of perinatal deaths often result in discrepancies between autopsy findings and witness accounts. The mechanism by which the umbilical cord is severed after delivery is a common quandary. Confirming or refuting the mother's stated method frequently has significant investigative importance; however, a surprising paucity of data currently exists to allow an objective opinion about the likely mechanism. Ninety-nine placentas with umbilical cords were examined. By random selection, each cord was severed by one of the following tools or mechanisms: knives, scissors, traction, or crush. Each break was examined and photographed, and a tissue section from the broken end examined microscopically. Differentiation of mechanism was best done grossly based on specific pattern recognition. Umbilical cords severed by blunt force have distinctly different morphology from those severed by sharp force. Even similar-appearing sharp force transections frequently have mechanism-specific distinctive patterns of injury.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84865861357&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84865861357&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1556-4029.2012.02116.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1556-4029.2012.02116.x

M3 - Article

VL - 57

SP - 1222

EP - 1225

JO - Journal of Forensic Sciences

JF - Journal of Forensic Sciences

SN - 0022-1198

IS - 5

ER -