Patterns of family functioning and diabetes-specific conflict in relation to glycemic control and health-related quality of life among youth with type 1 diabetes

Tiffany M. Rybak, Jeanelle S. Ali, Kristoffer S. Berlin, Kimberly L. Klages, Gabrielle G. Banks, Rebecca C. Kamody, Robert J. Ferry, Ramin Alemzadeh, Alicia Diaz Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective General and diabetes-specific family functioning may be associated with youth's adaptation to type 1 diabetes (T1D); however, empirically derived patterns of family functioning and diabetes-specific conflict among youth have not been explored in relation to T1D adaptation. Methods Youth (N=161, aged 12-18) with T1D and caregivers completed measures of family functioning and diabetes-specific conflict that served as indicators in latent profile analyses. Differences in glycemic control (measured by hemoglobin A1cs [HbA1c] and health-related quality of life [HRQoL]) were compared across profiles. Results Four profiles that varied by levels of family functioning, diabetes-specific conflict, and congruence between youth and caregiver perspectives emerged and related to T1D adaptation differently. Greater agreement between caregiver and youth and lower diabetes-specific conflict was associated with lower HbA1c and greater HRQoL. Conclusions Person-centered approaches are useful to quantify how many individuals fit into a particular pattern and determine how specific family dynamics may function together differently in relation to T1D adaptation for various subgroups of the population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)40-51
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of pediatric psychology
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Quality of Life
Caregivers
Hemoglobins
Family Relations
Conflict (Psychology)
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Patterns of family functioning and diabetes-specific conflict in relation to glycemic control and health-related quality of life among youth with type 1 diabetes. / Rybak, Tiffany M.; Ali, Jeanelle S.; Berlin, Kristoffer S.; Klages, Kimberly L.; Banks, Gabrielle G.; Kamody, Rebecca C.; Ferry, Robert J.; Alemzadeh, Ramin; Diaz Thomas, Alicia.

In: Journal of pediatric psychology, Vol. 42, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 40-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rybak, Tiffany M. ; Ali, Jeanelle S. ; Berlin, Kristoffer S. ; Klages, Kimberly L. ; Banks, Gabrielle G. ; Kamody, Rebecca C. ; Ferry, Robert J. ; Alemzadeh, Ramin ; Diaz Thomas, Alicia. / Patterns of family functioning and diabetes-specific conflict in relation to glycemic control and health-related quality of life among youth with type 1 diabetes. In: Journal of pediatric psychology. 2017 ; Vol. 42, No. 1. pp. 40-51.
@article{e457d9e8cbe64f2da025abe29d5c2462,
title = "Patterns of family functioning and diabetes-specific conflict in relation to glycemic control and health-related quality of life among youth with type 1 diabetes",
abstract = "Objective General and diabetes-specific family functioning may be associated with youth's adaptation to type 1 diabetes (T1D); however, empirically derived patterns of family functioning and diabetes-specific conflict among youth have not been explored in relation to T1D adaptation. Methods Youth (N=161, aged 12-18) with T1D and caregivers completed measures of family functioning and diabetes-specific conflict that served as indicators in latent profile analyses. Differences in glycemic control (measured by hemoglobin A1cs [HbA1c] and health-related quality of life [HRQoL]) were compared across profiles. Results Four profiles that varied by levels of family functioning, diabetes-specific conflict, and congruence between youth and caregiver perspectives emerged and related to T1D adaptation differently. Greater agreement between caregiver and youth and lower diabetes-specific conflict was associated with lower HbA1c and greater HRQoL. Conclusions Person-centered approaches are useful to quantify how many individuals fit into a particular pattern and determine how specific family dynamics may function together differently in relation to T1D adaptation for various subgroups of the population.",
author = "Rybak, {Tiffany M.} and Ali, {Jeanelle S.} and Berlin, {Kristoffer S.} and Klages, {Kimberly L.} and Banks, {Gabrielle G.} and Kamody, {Rebecca C.} and Ferry, {Robert J.} and Ramin Alemzadeh and {Diaz Thomas}, Alicia",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/jpepsy/jsw071",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "42",
pages = "40--51",
journal = "Journal of Pediatric Psychology",
issn = "0146-8693",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patterns of family functioning and diabetes-specific conflict in relation to glycemic control and health-related quality of life among youth with type 1 diabetes

AU - Rybak, Tiffany M.

AU - Ali, Jeanelle S.

AU - Berlin, Kristoffer S.

AU - Klages, Kimberly L.

AU - Banks, Gabrielle G.

AU - Kamody, Rebecca C.

AU - Ferry, Robert J.

AU - Alemzadeh, Ramin

AU - Diaz Thomas, Alicia

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - Objective General and diabetes-specific family functioning may be associated with youth's adaptation to type 1 diabetes (T1D); however, empirically derived patterns of family functioning and diabetes-specific conflict among youth have not been explored in relation to T1D adaptation. Methods Youth (N=161, aged 12-18) with T1D and caregivers completed measures of family functioning and diabetes-specific conflict that served as indicators in latent profile analyses. Differences in glycemic control (measured by hemoglobin A1cs [HbA1c] and health-related quality of life [HRQoL]) were compared across profiles. Results Four profiles that varied by levels of family functioning, diabetes-specific conflict, and congruence between youth and caregiver perspectives emerged and related to T1D adaptation differently. Greater agreement between caregiver and youth and lower diabetes-specific conflict was associated with lower HbA1c and greater HRQoL. Conclusions Person-centered approaches are useful to quantify how many individuals fit into a particular pattern and determine how specific family dynamics may function together differently in relation to T1D adaptation for various subgroups of the population.

AB - Objective General and diabetes-specific family functioning may be associated with youth's adaptation to type 1 diabetes (T1D); however, empirically derived patterns of family functioning and diabetes-specific conflict among youth have not been explored in relation to T1D adaptation. Methods Youth (N=161, aged 12-18) with T1D and caregivers completed measures of family functioning and diabetes-specific conflict that served as indicators in latent profile analyses. Differences in glycemic control (measured by hemoglobin A1cs [HbA1c] and health-related quality of life [HRQoL]) were compared across profiles. Results Four profiles that varied by levels of family functioning, diabetes-specific conflict, and congruence between youth and caregiver perspectives emerged and related to T1D adaptation differently. Greater agreement between caregiver and youth and lower diabetes-specific conflict was associated with lower HbA1c and greater HRQoL. Conclusions Person-centered approaches are useful to quantify how many individuals fit into a particular pattern and determine how specific family dynamics may function together differently in relation to T1D adaptation for various subgroups of the population.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85015846280&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85015846280&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/jpepsy/jsw071

DO - 10.1093/jpepsy/jsw071

M3 - Article

C2 - 28173113

AN - SCOPUS:85015846280

VL - 42

SP - 40

EP - 51

JO - Journal of Pediatric Psychology

JF - Journal of Pediatric Psychology

SN - 0146-8693

IS - 1

ER -