Patterns of incisor root resorption before and after orthodontic correction in cases with anterior open bites

Edward Harris, Monte L. Butler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

69 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

External root resorption is a frequent iatrogenic consequence of orthodontic treatment, particularly in the maxillary anterior teeth. Since resorption also occurs as a normal function of aging and since altered behaviors such as bruxism and chronic nailbking accelerate resorption even in the absence of treatment, it was hypothesized that the long-term orthopedic forces of tongue thrusting leading to anterior open bites would also enhance the rates of clastic activity. In a series of 32 adolescents with open bites, the roots of permanent maxillary central incisors were significantly shorter and exhibited higher modal grades of periapical resorption than a matched series with deep bites before treatment. The open bite group also had less facial bony support for these teeth. Both series experienced discernible resorption during full-banded treatment but to comparable extents so that, after active treatment, the open bite series continued to possess significantly greater degrees of resorption. Consequently, the oral forces leading to apertognathia are themselves destructive of root integrity and merit early recognition and interception.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)112-119
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
Volume101
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Open Bite
Root Resorption
Incisor
Orthodontics
Tooth
Bruxism
Overbite
Therapeutics
Tongue
Orthopedics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthodontics

Cite this

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abstract = "External root resorption is a frequent iatrogenic consequence of orthodontic treatment, particularly in the maxillary anterior teeth. Since resorption also occurs as a normal function of aging and since altered behaviors such as bruxism and chronic nailbking accelerate resorption even in the absence of treatment, it was hypothesized that the long-term orthopedic forces of tongue thrusting leading to anterior open bites would also enhance the rates of clastic activity. In a series of 32 adolescents with open bites, the roots of permanent maxillary central incisors were significantly shorter and exhibited higher modal grades of periapical resorption than a matched series with deep bites before treatment. The open bite group also had less facial bony support for these teeth. Both series experienced discernible resorption during full-banded treatment but to comparable extents so that, after active treatment, the open bite series continued to possess significantly greater degrees of resorption. Consequently, the oral forces leading to apertognathia are themselves destructive of root integrity and merit early recognition and interception.",
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AB - External root resorption is a frequent iatrogenic consequence of orthodontic treatment, particularly in the maxillary anterior teeth. Since resorption also occurs as a normal function of aging and since altered behaviors such as bruxism and chronic nailbking accelerate resorption even in the absence of treatment, it was hypothesized that the long-term orthopedic forces of tongue thrusting leading to anterior open bites would also enhance the rates of clastic activity. In a series of 32 adolescents with open bites, the roots of permanent maxillary central incisors were significantly shorter and exhibited higher modal grades of periapical resorption than a matched series with deep bites before treatment. The open bite group also had less facial bony support for these teeth. Both series experienced discernible resorption during full-banded treatment but to comparable extents so that, after active treatment, the open bite series continued to possess significantly greater degrees of resorption. Consequently, the oral forces leading to apertognathia are themselves destructive of root integrity and merit early recognition and interception.

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