Patterns of myocardial fibrosis

Karl Weber, Ruth Pick, Jorge E. Jalil, Joseph S. Janicki, Eugenia P. Carroll

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

125 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The interstitium of the myocardium is composed of predominantly type I collagen; type III collagen is present to a lesser extent. The fibrillar collagens serve as tethers between muscle cells, muscle fibers, and blood vessels while also providing a scaffolding that supports the muscular and vascular compartments. In pressure overload hypertrophy, a continuous structural remodeling of the fibrillar collagen matrix is seen. What is initially an adaptive process that enhances tensile strength can eventuate in pathologic hypertrophy with muscle fiber entrapment, cell loss, and abnormal diastolic and systolic stiffness of the myocardium. Morphologically distinct patterns of myocardial collagen accumulation, or fibrosis, have been identified based on the alignment of thick and thin collagen fibers to one another and to cardiac muscle. Each pattern, representing either a reactive (without necrosis) or reparative process, can alter stiffness in a unique manner. The manner in which the interstitium regulates the nature and proportion of fibrillar collagen formation is unknown and deserving of further study. Such information may lead to the development of antifibrotic agents that counteract, prevent or modify disproportionate collagen remodeling in pressure overload hypertrophy. These agents may thereby ultimately represent corrective forms of therapy for the management of heart failure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)121-131
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology
Volume21
Issue numberSUPPL. 5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989

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Fibrillar Collagens
Hypertrophy
Myocardium
Fibrosis
Collagen
Blood Vessels
Pressure
Muscles
Collagen Type III
Tensile Strength
Collagen Type I
Muscle Cells
Necrosis
Heart Failure
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Weber, K., Pick, R., Jalil, J. E., Janicki, J. S., & Carroll, E. P. (1989). Patterns of myocardial fibrosis. Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, 21(SUPPL. 5), 121-131. https://doi.org/10.1016/0022-2828(89)90778-5

Patterns of myocardial fibrosis. / Weber, Karl; Pick, Ruth; Jalil, Jorge E.; Janicki, Joseph S.; Carroll, Eugenia P.

In: Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, Vol. 21, No. SUPPL. 5, 01.01.1989, p. 121-131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weber, K, Pick, R, Jalil, JE, Janicki, JS & Carroll, EP 1989, 'Patterns of myocardial fibrosis', Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, vol. 21, no. SUPPL. 5, pp. 121-131. https://doi.org/10.1016/0022-2828(89)90778-5
Weber, Karl ; Pick, Ruth ; Jalil, Jorge E. ; Janicki, Joseph S. ; Carroll, Eugenia P. / Patterns of myocardial fibrosis. In: Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology. 1989 ; Vol. 21, No. SUPPL. 5. pp. 121-131.
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