Pediatric cancer survivorship research

Experience of the childhood cancer survivor study

Wendy M. Leisenring, Ann C. Mertens, Gregory Armstrong, Marilyn A. Stovall, Joseph P. Neglia, Jennifer Q. Lanctot, John D. Boice, John A. Whitton, Yutaka Yasui

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

152 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) is a comprehensive multicenter study designed to quantify and better understand the effects of pediatric cancer and its treatment on later health, including behavioral and sociodemographic outcomes. The CCSS investigators have published more than 100 articles in the scientific literature related to the study. As with any large cohort study, high standards for methodologic approaches are imperative for valid and generalizable results. In this article we describe methodological issues of study design, exposure assessment, outcome validation, and statistical analysis. Methods for handling missing data, intrafamily correlation, and competing risks analysis are addressed; each with particular relevance to pediatric cancer survivorship research. Our goal in this article is to provide a resource and reference for other researchers working in the area of long-term cancer survivorship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2319-2327
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume27
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - May 10 2009

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Pediatrics
Research
Neoplasms
Research Personnel
Literature
Multicenter Studies
Cohort Studies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Leisenring, W. M., Mertens, A. C., Armstrong, G., Stovall, M. A., Neglia, J. P., Lanctot, J. Q., ... Yasui, Y. (2009). Pediatric cancer survivorship research: Experience of the childhood cancer survivor study. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 27(14), 2319-2327. https://doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2008.21.1813

Pediatric cancer survivorship research : Experience of the childhood cancer survivor study. / Leisenring, Wendy M.; Mertens, Ann C.; Armstrong, Gregory; Stovall, Marilyn A.; Neglia, Joseph P.; Lanctot, Jennifer Q.; Boice, John D.; Whitton, John A.; Yasui, Yutaka.

In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, Vol. 27, No. 14, 10.05.2009, p. 2319-2327.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Leisenring, WM, Mertens, AC, Armstrong, G, Stovall, MA, Neglia, JP, Lanctot, JQ, Boice, JD, Whitton, JA & Yasui, Y 2009, 'Pediatric cancer survivorship research: Experience of the childhood cancer survivor study', Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 27, no. 14, pp. 2319-2327. https://doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2008.21.1813
Leisenring, Wendy M. ; Mertens, Ann C. ; Armstrong, Gregory ; Stovall, Marilyn A. ; Neglia, Joseph P. ; Lanctot, Jennifer Q. ; Boice, John D. ; Whitton, John A. ; Yasui, Yutaka. / Pediatric cancer survivorship research : Experience of the childhood cancer survivor study. In: Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2009 ; Vol. 27, No. 14. pp. 2319-2327.
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