Pediatric scalds: Do cooking-related burns have a higher injury burden?

Marielena Bachier, Sarah E. Hammond, Regan Williams, Timothy Jancelewicz, Alexander Feliz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background Pediatric scald burns result in frequent emergency room visits and hospitalizations. We investigated whether cooking-related burns produce greater morbidity requiring more extensive care than noncooking burns. Methods We performed a 6-y review at our free-standing children's hospital. Children aged <18 y admitted for accidental scald burns were included. Demographics, injury pattern, treatment, and outcome (contractures and/or limited mobility and nonhealing and/or infected wounds) data were analyzed comparing cooking versus noncooking burns. The Mann-Whitney U test, a chi-square test, and the negative binomial were used to compare continuous, categorical, and count data between groups. Bivariate analysis was performed to identify risk factors among patients with adverse outcomes. Results We identified 308 patients; 262 (85%) cooking and 46 (15%) noncooking burns. Most patients were African-American males, with public insurance, and a median age of 2 y. Cooking burns preferentially occurred over the head, neck, and upper body; noncooking burns were distributed over the lower body (P < 0.02). Median total body surface area was equal for both groups (P > 0.11). In subgroup analysis, semisolid and grease burns resulted in increased rates of wound contractures and/or limited mobility when compared with noncooking burns (P = 0.05 and P = 0.008, respectively). Patients with complications were more likely to have third degree burns and required more consults, longer hospitalization, and more surgical debridements and clinic visits. Conclusions Most accidental scald burns occurred in young children during food preparation. Greater long-term morbidity was found in patients with semisolid and grease burns. This subset of children has a higher injury burden and requires extensive care in the acute and long-term setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)230-236
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume199
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015

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Cooking
Burns
Pediatrics
Wounds and Injuries
Hospitalization
Morbidity
Contracture
Debridement
Ambulatory Care
Hospital Emergency Service
Food

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

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Pediatric scalds : Do cooking-related burns have a higher injury burden? / Bachier, Marielena; Hammond, Sarah E.; Williams, Regan; Jancelewicz, Timothy; Feliz, Alexander.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 199, No. 1, 01.11.2015, p. 230-236.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bachier, Marielena ; Hammond, Sarah E. ; Williams, Regan ; Jancelewicz, Timothy ; Feliz, Alexander. / Pediatric scalds : Do cooking-related burns have a higher injury burden?. In: Journal of Surgical Research. 2015 ; Vol. 199, No. 1. pp. 230-236.
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abstract = "Background Pediatric scald burns result in frequent emergency room visits and hospitalizations. We investigated whether cooking-related burns produce greater morbidity requiring more extensive care than noncooking burns. Methods We performed a 6-y review at our free-standing children's hospital. Children aged <18 y admitted for accidental scald burns were included. Demographics, injury pattern, treatment, and outcome (contractures and/or limited mobility and nonhealing and/or infected wounds) data were analyzed comparing cooking versus noncooking burns. The Mann-Whitney U test, a chi-square test, and the negative binomial were used to compare continuous, categorical, and count data between groups. Bivariate analysis was performed to identify risk factors among patients with adverse outcomes. Results We identified 308 patients; 262 (85{\%}) cooking and 46 (15{\%}) noncooking burns. Most patients were African-American males, with public insurance, and a median age of 2 y. Cooking burns preferentially occurred over the head, neck, and upper body; noncooking burns were distributed over the lower body (P < 0.02). Median total body surface area was equal for both groups (P > 0.11). In subgroup analysis, semisolid and grease burns resulted in increased rates of wound contractures and/or limited mobility when compared with noncooking burns (P = 0.05 and P = 0.008, respectively). Patients with complications were more likely to have third degree burns and required more consults, longer hospitalization, and more surgical debridements and clinic visits. Conclusions Most accidental scald burns occurred in young children during food preparation. Greater long-term morbidity was found in patients with semisolid and grease burns. This subset of children has a higher injury burden and requires extensive care in the acute and long-term setting.",
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