Perceived physician-informed weight status predicts accurate weight self-perception and weight self-regulation in low-income, African American women

Charlie L. Harris, Gregory Strayhorn, Sandra Moore, Brian Goldman, Michelle Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Obese African American women under- appraise their body mass index (BMI) classification and report fewer weight loss attempts than women who accurately appraise their weight status. This cross- sectional study examined whether physician- informed weight status could predict weight self- perception and weight self- regulation strategies in obese women. Methods. A convenience sample of 118 low- income women completed a survey assessing demographic characteristics, comorbidities, weight self- perception, and weight self- regulation strategies. BMI was calculated during nurse triage. Binary logistic regression models were performed to test hypotheses. Results. The odds of obese accurate appraisers having been informed about their weight status were six times greater than those of under- appraisers. The odds of those using an "approach" self- regulation strategy having been physician- informed were four times greater compared with those using an "avoidance" strategy. Discussion. Physicians are uniquely positioned to influence accurate weight self- perception and adaptive weight self- regulation strategies in underserved women, reducing their risk for obesity- related morbidity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1441-1463
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of health care for the poor and underserved
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2016

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Weight Perception
Self Concept
African Americans
Physicians
Weights and Measures
Body Mass Index
Logistic Models
Triage
Self-Control
Comorbidity
Weight Loss
Obesity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Nurses
Demography
Morbidity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Perceived physician-informed weight status predicts accurate weight self-perception and weight self-regulation in low-income, African American women. / Harris, Charlie L.; Strayhorn, Gregory; Moore, Sandra; Goldman, Brian; Martin, Michelle.

In: Journal of health care for the poor and underserved, Vol. 27, No. 3, 01.08.2016, p. 1441-1463.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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