Perceptual weighting of stop consonant cues by normal and impaired listeners in reverberation versus noise

Mark Hedrick, Mary Sue Younger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To determine if listeners with normal hearing and listeners with sensorineural hearing loss give different perceptual weightings to cues for stop consonant place of articulation in noise versus reverberation listening conditions. Method: Nine listeners with normal hearing (23-28 years of age) and 10 listeners with sensorineural hearing loss (31-79 years of age, median 66 years) participated. The listeners were asked to label the consonantal portion of synthetic CV stimuli as either /p/ or /t/. Two cues were varied: (a) the amplitude of the spectral peak in the F4/F5 frequency region of the burst was varied across a 30-dB range relative to the adjacent vowel peak amplitude in the same frequency region, (b) F2/F3 formant transition onset frequencies were either appropriate for /p/, /t/ or neutral for the labial/alveolar contrast. Results: Weightings of relative amplitude and transition cues for voiceless stop consonants depended on the listening condition (quiet, noise, or reverberation), hearing loss, and age of listener. The effects of age with hearing loss reduced the perceptual integration of cues, particularly in reverberation. The effects of hearing loss reduced the effectiveness of both cues, notably relative amplitude in reverberation. Conclusions: Reverberation and noise conditions have different perceptual effects. Hearing loss and age may have different, separable effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)254-269
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
Volume50
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

weighting
listener
Cues
Noise
Hearing Loss
Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Hearing
Lip
Reverberation
Stop Consonants
Hearing Impairment
Listeners
stimulus

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Perceptual weighting of stop consonant cues by normal and impaired listeners in reverberation versus noise. / Hedrick, Mark; Younger, Mary Sue.

In: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Vol. 50, No. 2, 01.04.2007, p. 254-269.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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