Percutaneous closure of the small (< 2.5 mm) patent ductus arteriosus using coil embolization

Patrick A. Cambier, William C. Kirby, Dale Wortham, John W. Moore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

269 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Persistently patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is a common form of congenital heart disease, occurring between 0.01 to 0.08% of live births.1 Surgical ligation by lateral thoracotomy is effective, yet carries procedural risks (potential bleeding, recurrent laryngeal nerve injury, exposure to general anesthesia and death [<1%]).2 In 1971, Porstmann et al3 described the first nonsurgical PDA closure with an Ivalon plug with an 18Fr arterial conduit. More recently, the Rashkind PDA double disc occlusion system has undergone extensive evaluation, with flow occlusion accomplished in 72 to 88% of cases attempted.4-6 The smaller Rashkind occluder requires an 8Fr delivery system. Rao et al7 described an occluder which may be introduced through a 7Fr catheter and reduces the crossing profile required. Nevertheless, technical limitations persist in patients whose PDA internal diameter is <2.5 mm. Techniques to facilitate cannulation of the very small ductus by the Rashkind delivery system, involving arterial cannulation and rendezvous of an exchange wire from femoral vein to contralateral artery,8 and ductal dilation with balloon angioplasty,9 have been described. These techniques require additional manipulations and procedural time, and may potentially increase patient morbidity. This report describes experience with an alternative technique for transcatheter closure of the very small ductus arteriosus using stainless steel coil embolization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)815-816
Number of pages2
JournalThe American journal of cardiology
Volume69
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Patent Ductus Arteriosus
Catheterization
Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Injuries
Ductus Arteriosus
Balloon Angioplasty
Femoral Vein
Stainless Steel
Thoracotomy
General Anesthesia
Ligation
Dilatation
Heart Diseases
Catheters
Arteries
Hemorrhage
Morbidity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Percutaneous closure of the small (< 2.5 mm) patent ductus arteriosus using coil embolization. / Cambier, Patrick A.; Kirby, William C.; Wortham, Dale; Moore, John W.

In: The American journal of cardiology, Vol. 69, No. 8, 15.03.1992, p. 815-816.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cambier, Patrick A. ; Kirby, William C. ; Wortham, Dale ; Moore, John W. / Percutaneous closure of the small (< 2.5 mm) patent ductus arteriosus using coil embolization. In: The American journal of cardiology. 1992 ; Vol. 69, No. 8. pp. 815-816.
@article{9b0328f8e42f4ebcbce3fc1c3244d86c,
title = "Percutaneous closure of the small (< 2.5 mm) patent ductus arteriosus using coil embolization",
abstract = "Persistently patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is a common form of congenital heart disease, occurring between 0.01 to 0.08{\%} of live births.1 Surgical ligation by lateral thoracotomy is effective, yet carries procedural risks (potential bleeding, recurrent laryngeal nerve injury, exposure to general anesthesia and death [<1{\%}]).2 In 1971, Porstmann et al3 described the first nonsurgical PDA closure with an Ivalon plug with an 18Fr arterial conduit. More recently, the Rashkind PDA double disc occlusion system has undergone extensive evaluation, with flow occlusion accomplished in 72 to 88{\%} of cases attempted.4-6 The smaller Rashkind occluder requires an 8Fr delivery system. Rao et al7 described an occluder which may be introduced through a 7Fr catheter and reduces the crossing profile required. Nevertheless, technical limitations persist in patients whose PDA internal diameter is <2.5 mm. Techniques to facilitate cannulation of the very small ductus by the Rashkind delivery system, involving arterial cannulation and rendezvous of an exchange wire from femoral vein to contralateral artery,8 and ductal dilation with balloon angioplasty,9 have been described. These techniques require additional manipulations and procedural time, and may potentially increase patient morbidity. This report describes experience with an alternative technique for transcatheter closure of the very small ductus arteriosus using stainless steel coil embolization.",
author = "Cambier, {Patrick A.} and Kirby, {William C.} and Dale Wortham and Moore, {John W.}",
year = "1992",
month = "3",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/0002-9149(92)90514-Y",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "69",
pages = "815--816",
journal = "American Journal of Cardiology",
issn = "0002-9149",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Percutaneous closure of the small (< 2.5 mm) patent ductus arteriosus using coil embolization

AU - Cambier, Patrick A.

AU - Kirby, William C.

AU - Wortham, Dale

AU - Moore, John W.

PY - 1992/3/15

Y1 - 1992/3/15

N2 - Persistently patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is a common form of congenital heart disease, occurring between 0.01 to 0.08% of live births.1 Surgical ligation by lateral thoracotomy is effective, yet carries procedural risks (potential bleeding, recurrent laryngeal nerve injury, exposure to general anesthesia and death [<1%]).2 In 1971, Porstmann et al3 described the first nonsurgical PDA closure with an Ivalon plug with an 18Fr arterial conduit. More recently, the Rashkind PDA double disc occlusion system has undergone extensive evaluation, with flow occlusion accomplished in 72 to 88% of cases attempted.4-6 The smaller Rashkind occluder requires an 8Fr delivery system. Rao et al7 described an occluder which may be introduced through a 7Fr catheter and reduces the crossing profile required. Nevertheless, technical limitations persist in patients whose PDA internal diameter is <2.5 mm. Techniques to facilitate cannulation of the very small ductus by the Rashkind delivery system, involving arterial cannulation and rendezvous of an exchange wire from femoral vein to contralateral artery,8 and ductal dilation with balloon angioplasty,9 have been described. These techniques require additional manipulations and procedural time, and may potentially increase patient morbidity. This report describes experience with an alternative technique for transcatheter closure of the very small ductus arteriosus using stainless steel coil embolization.

AB - Persistently patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is a common form of congenital heart disease, occurring between 0.01 to 0.08% of live births.1 Surgical ligation by lateral thoracotomy is effective, yet carries procedural risks (potential bleeding, recurrent laryngeal nerve injury, exposure to general anesthesia and death [<1%]).2 In 1971, Porstmann et al3 described the first nonsurgical PDA closure with an Ivalon plug with an 18Fr arterial conduit. More recently, the Rashkind PDA double disc occlusion system has undergone extensive evaluation, with flow occlusion accomplished in 72 to 88% of cases attempted.4-6 The smaller Rashkind occluder requires an 8Fr delivery system. Rao et al7 described an occluder which may be introduced through a 7Fr catheter and reduces the crossing profile required. Nevertheless, technical limitations persist in patients whose PDA internal diameter is <2.5 mm. Techniques to facilitate cannulation of the very small ductus by the Rashkind delivery system, involving arterial cannulation and rendezvous of an exchange wire from femoral vein to contralateral artery,8 and ductal dilation with balloon angioplasty,9 have been described. These techniques require additional manipulations and procedural time, and may potentially increase patient morbidity. This report describes experience with an alternative technique for transcatheter closure of the very small ductus arteriosus using stainless steel coil embolization.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0026551445&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0026551445&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0002-9149(92)90514-Y

DO - 10.1016/0002-9149(92)90514-Y

M3 - Article

VL - 69

SP - 815

EP - 816

JO - American Journal of Cardiology

JF - American Journal of Cardiology

SN - 0002-9149

IS - 8

ER -