Perinatal outcome in women with recurrent preeclampsia compared with women who develop preeclampsia as nulliparas

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Network of Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

127 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To compare the rates and perinatal outcome in women who experienced preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy to those in women who developed preeclampsia as nulliparas. STUDY DESIGN: This is a secondary analysis of data from 2 separate multi-center trials of aspirin for prevention of preeclampsia. Women who had preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy (n = 598) were compared with nulliparous women (n = 2934). Outcome variables were rates of preeclampsia, preterm delivery at <37 and <35 weeks of gestation, small-for-gestational-age infant, abruptio placentae, and perinatal death. Data were compared by using chi-square analysis and Wilcoxon rank sum test. RESULTS: The rates of preeclampsia and of severe preeclampsia were significantly higher in the previous preeclamptic group as compared to the nulliparous group (17.9% vs 5.3%, P <.0001, and 7.5% vs. 2.4%, P <.0001, respectively). Women who had recurrent preeclampsia experienced more preterm deliveries before 37 and 35 weeks of gestation than nulliparous women who developed preeclampsia. In addition, among women who developed severe preeclampsia, those with recurrent preeclampsia had higher rates of preterm delivery both before 37 weeks (67% vs 33%, P =.0004) and before 35 weeks of gestation (36% vs 19%, P=.041), and higher rates of abruptio placentae (6.7% vs 1.5%) and fetal death (6.7% vs 1.4%) than did nulliparous women. CONCLUSION: Compared to nulliparous women, women with preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy had significantly higher rates of preeclampsia and adverse perinatal outcomes associated with preterm delivery as a result of preeclampsia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)422-426
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume186
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

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Pre-Eclampsia
Pregnancy
Abruptio Placentae
Nonparametric Statistics
Small for Gestational Age Infant
Fetal Death
Aspirin

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Perinatal outcome in women with recurrent preeclampsia compared with women who develop preeclampsia as nulliparas. / National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Network of Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 186, No. 3, 01.01.2002, p. 422-426.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Network of Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units 2002, 'Perinatal outcome in women with recurrent preeclampsia compared with women who develop preeclampsia as nulliparas', American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 186, no. 3, pp. 422-426. https://doi.org/10.1067/mob.2002.120280
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Network of Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units. / Perinatal outcome in women with recurrent preeclampsia compared with women who develop preeclampsia as nulliparas. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2002 ; Vol. 186, No. 3. pp. 422-426.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To compare the rates and perinatal outcome in women who experienced preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy to those in women who developed preeclampsia as nulliparas. STUDY DESIGN: This is a secondary analysis of data from 2 separate multi-center trials of aspirin for prevention of preeclampsia. Women who had preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy (n = 598) were compared with nulliparous women (n = 2934). Outcome variables were rates of preeclampsia, preterm delivery at <37 and <35 weeks of gestation, small-for-gestational-age infant, abruptio placentae, and perinatal death. Data were compared by using chi-square analysis and Wilcoxon rank sum test. RESULTS: The rates of preeclampsia and of severe preeclampsia were significantly higher in the previous preeclamptic group as compared to the nulliparous group (17.9{\%} vs 5.3{\%}, P <.0001, and 7.5{\%} vs. 2.4{\%}, P <.0001, respectively). Women who had recurrent preeclampsia experienced more preterm deliveries before 37 and 35 weeks of gestation than nulliparous women who developed preeclampsia. In addition, among women who developed severe preeclampsia, those with recurrent preeclampsia had higher rates of preterm delivery both before 37 weeks (67{\%} vs 33{\%}, P =.0004) and before 35 weeks of gestation (36{\%} vs 19{\%}, P=.041), and higher rates of abruptio placentae (6.7{\%} vs 1.5{\%}) and fetal death (6.7{\%} vs 1.4{\%}) than did nulliparous women. CONCLUSION: Compared to nulliparous women, women with preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy had significantly higher rates of preeclampsia and adverse perinatal outcomes associated with preterm delivery as a result of preeclampsia.",
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T1 - Perinatal outcome in women with recurrent preeclampsia compared with women who develop preeclampsia as nulliparas

AU - National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Network of Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units

AU - Hnat, Michael D.

AU - Sibai, Baha M.

AU - Caritis, Steve

AU - Hauth, John

AU - Lindheimer, Marshall D.

AU - MacPherson, Cora

AU - Van Dorsten, J. Peter

AU - Landon, Mark

AU - Miodovnik, Menachem

AU - Paul, Richard

AU - Meis, Paul

AU - Thurnau, Gary

AU - Dombrowski, Mitchell

AU - Harger, J.

AU - Controneo, M.

AU - Kamon, T.

AU - Mercer, B.

AU - Ramsey, R.

AU - Rabello, Y.

AU - McCart, D.

AU - Ramsey, Risa

AU - Goldenberg, R.

AU - Cooper, R.

AU - Norman, G.

AU - Millinder, A.

AU - Christmas, J.

AU - McCoy, S.

AU - Elder, S.

AU - Elder, N.

AU - Carter, B.

AU - Schneider, V.

AU - Meier, A.

AU - Minton, V.

AU - Swain, M.

AU - Ernest, J. M.

AU - Moawad, A.

AU - Jones, P.

AU - Iams, J.

AU - Meadows, S.

AU - Brenner, S.

AU - Collins, B.

AU - Newman, R.

AU - Carter, S.

AU - Romero, R.

AU - Sabo, V.

AU - Godfrey, S.

AU - Rosen, M.

AU - Chao, R.

AU - Witter, R.

AU - Rocco, L.

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N2 - OBJECTIVE: To compare the rates and perinatal outcome in women who experienced preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy to those in women who developed preeclampsia as nulliparas. STUDY DESIGN: This is a secondary analysis of data from 2 separate multi-center trials of aspirin for prevention of preeclampsia. Women who had preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy (n = 598) were compared with nulliparous women (n = 2934). Outcome variables were rates of preeclampsia, preterm delivery at <37 and <35 weeks of gestation, small-for-gestational-age infant, abruptio placentae, and perinatal death. Data were compared by using chi-square analysis and Wilcoxon rank sum test. RESULTS: The rates of preeclampsia and of severe preeclampsia were significantly higher in the previous preeclamptic group as compared to the nulliparous group (17.9% vs 5.3%, P <.0001, and 7.5% vs. 2.4%, P <.0001, respectively). Women who had recurrent preeclampsia experienced more preterm deliveries before 37 and 35 weeks of gestation than nulliparous women who developed preeclampsia. In addition, among women who developed severe preeclampsia, those with recurrent preeclampsia had higher rates of preterm delivery both before 37 weeks (67% vs 33%, P =.0004) and before 35 weeks of gestation (36% vs 19%, P=.041), and higher rates of abruptio placentae (6.7% vs 1.5%) and fetal death (6.7% vs 1.4%) than did nulliparous women. CONCLUSION: Compared to nulliparous women, women with preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy had significantly higher rates of preeclampsia and adverse perinatal outcomes associated with preterm delivery as a result of preeclampsia.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To compare the rates and perinatal outcome in women who experienced preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy to those in women who developed preeclampsia as nulliparas. STUDY DESIGN: This is a secondary analysis of data from 2 separate multi-center trials of aspirin for prevention of preeclampsia. Women who had preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy (n = 598) were compared with nulliparous women (n = 2934). Outcome variables were rates of preeclampsia, preterm delivery at <37 and <35 weeks of gestation, small-for-gestational-age infant, abruptio placentae, and perinatal death. Data were compared by using chi-square analysis and Wilcoxon rank sum test. RESULTS: The rates of preeclampsia and of severe preeclampsia were significantly higher in the previous preeclamptic group as compared to the nulliparous group (17.9% vs 5.3%, P <.0001, and 7.5% vs. 2.4%, P <.0001, respectively). Women who had recurrent preeclampsia experienced more preterm deliveries before 37 and 35 weeks of gestation than nulliparous women who developed preeclampsia. In addition, among women who developed severe preeclampsia, those with recurrent preeclampsia had higher rates of preterm delivery both before 37 weeks (67% vs 33%, P =.0004) and before 35 weeks of gestation (36% vs 19%, P=.041), and higher rates of abruptio placentae (6.7% vs 1.5%) and fetal death (6.7% vs 1.4%) than did nulliparous women. CONCLUSION: Compared to nulliparous women, women with preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy had significantly higher rates of preeclampsia and adverse perinatal outcomes associated with preterm delivery as a result of preeclampsia.

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DO - 10.1067/mob.2002.120280

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