Periodontal force

A potential cause of relapse

Thomas E. Southard, Karin A. Southard, Elizabeth Tolley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Relapse of aligned mandibular anterior teeth and the progressive collapse of the mandibular arch is a significant problem for orthodontists. However, identification of a specific cause of such relapse has proved elusive. The transseptal fiber system is thought to stabilize teeth against separating forces. It is hypothesized that this fiber system may actually maintain the contacts of approximating teeth in a state of compression, the long-term result of which could be contact slippage and collapse of the arch. The interproximal force (IPF) at the mandibular first molar-second premolar contact was investigated on the basis of previous studies with this representative contact. The IPF was measured in 10 subjects at six different widths of contact separation. By means of graphic plotting techniques, the IPF at zero separation was calculated to estimate the contact force when the molar and premolar were actually touching. The mean IPF at zero separation was found to be 36.7g (SE = 6.6g), and a t test confirmed the hypothesis that a state of compression between contacts exists (p < 0.0001). After chewing, the mean IPF at zero separation was 57.2g (SE = 9.1g), and a paired t test revealed an increase in contact compression had resulted (p < 0.01). It was concluded that the periodontium exerts a continuous force on the mandibular dentition and that this force acts to maintain the contacts of approximating teeth in a state of compression. This force is increased after occlusal loading and may help to explain long-term crowding of the mandibular anterior teeth, physiologic drifting of teeth, and maintenance of posterior dental contacts after interproximal wear. (AM J ORTHOD DENTOFAC ORTHOP 1992;101:221-7.).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-227
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
Volume101
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tooth
Recurrence
Bicuspid
Tooth Migration
Periodontium
Dentition
Mastication
Maintenance

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthodontics
  • Surgery
  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Periodontal force : A potential cause of relapse. / Southard, Thomas E.; Southard, Karin A.; Tolley, Elizabeth.

In: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Vol. 101, No. 3, 01.01.1992, p. 221-227.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Southard, Thomas E. ; Southard, Karin A. ; Tolley, Elizabeth. / Periodontal force : A potential cause of relapse. In: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics. 1992 ; Vol. 101, No. 3. pp. 221-227.
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