Persistent stenosis and deformity of the right pulmonary artery after correction of the Waterston anastomosis

J. M. Wilson, John Mack, K. Turley, P. A. Ebert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Between July, 1975, and July, 1979, 16 patients with cyanotic heart disease and previously constructed ascending aorta-right pulmonary artery (AA-RPA) shunts underwent subsequent operations. Fourteen of the 16 had significant physiological and anatomic problems associated with the shunts. Eight had kinking and preferential flow to the right pulmonary artery (RPA), 4 had preferential flow without kinking, and 2 had small pulmonary arteries bilaterally. Various techniques were used to close the RPA after Waterston takedown: direct suture in 4, pericardial patch in 5, prosthetic patch in 4, and conduit in 3. Five patients required reoperation 3 months to 3 years after Waterston dismantling because of persistent deformity of the RPA. Four patients had pericardial patch reconstruction of the RPA and one had direct closure of the opening in the RPA when the Waterston shunt was dismantled. All 5 patients received prosthetic patch enlargement of the RPA either alone or with a conduit. The 4 surviving patients are doing well 7 to 15 months following repair. Three have been studied angiographically and have been found to have no pulmonary artery deformity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)169-175
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume82
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 1981
Externally publishedYes

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Pulmonary Artery
Pathologic Constriction
Reoperation
Sutures
Aorta
Heart Diseases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Persistent stenosis and deformity of the right pulmonary artery after correction of the Waterston anastomosis. / Wilson, J. M.; Mack, John; Turley, K.; Ebert, P. A.

In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Vol. 82, No. 2, 01.01.1981, p. 169-175.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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