Pharmaceutical care provided by Doctor of Pharmacy clerkship students in geriatric patients in an acute care setting

Marie Chisholm-Burns, A. T. Taylor, D. W. Hawkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was undertaken to evaluate the pharmaceutical care provided for geriatric patients by Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) students on clerkships. Objectives of the study included: (1) teaching pharmacy students to identify, document, solve, and prevent medication-related problems; (2) documenting the number and types of recommendations made by Pharm.D. students; (3) determining the physician-acceptance rate of these suggestions; (4) determining the potential impact of students' recommendations on patient care; and (5) comparing students' recommendations for geriatric patients to non-geriatric patients. Fifteen Pharm.D. students enrolled at the University of Georgia College of Pharmacy assigned to general medicine or family medicine teams at the Medical College of Georgia Hospital during July 1995 through March 1996 participated in the study. Of the 174 recommendations that were made, 57 recommendations concerned patients greater than 65 years of age. Fifty-one (89.5%) of these recommendations were accepted by physicians. Improper medication selection, untreated indication, and overdosage prompted more than half of these recommendations. The most frequent medication classifications for accepted recommendations were the anti-infective (25.5%), cardiovascular (23.5%), and gastrointestinal (13.7%) classes. Two pharmacists evaluated each accepted recommendation by using Hatoum's criteria for assessing potential impact on patient care and indicated that approximately sixty-five percent of the accepted recommendations were considered significant (56.9), very significant (5.9%), or extremely significant (2%). The authors conclude that pharmacy students can have a positive impact on geriatric patient care in an acute care environment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-50
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Geriatric Drug Therapy
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Pharmacy Students
Pharmaceutical Services
Geriatrics
Students
Patient Care
Medicine
Physicians
Pharmacists
Teaching

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Pharmaceutical care provided by Doctor of Pharmacy clerkship students in geriatric patients in an acute care setting. / Chisholm-Burns, Marie; Taylor, A. T.; Hawkins, D. W.

In: Journal of Geriatric Drug Therapy, Vol. 11, No. 4, 01.12.1997, p. 43-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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