Pharmacogenetics of cocaine

A critical review

Andrew C. Morse, V. Gene Erwin, Byron Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The development of genetic models to help explain individual differences in sensitivity to and susceptibility to misuse certain CNS active substances, like ethanol and psychostimulants, spans a brief, thirty-plus years. The first animal models involved inbred strains and selected lines of mice and rats and predicted genetic-based differential sensitivity to ethanol and its misuse in humans found a few years later. With drugs like cocaine, tracking genetic differences in sensitivity and misuse liability in humans is difficult because of legal problems. Genetically-defined animals, however, have shown most if not all of cocainerelated behavioural, neurophysiological and toxicological effects to evince wide variation with most effects being influenced by several genes. Thus, we argue that animal and human studies of individual differences in drug sensitivity be studied from both quantitative and molecular genetic approaches. For the former, new techniques involving recombinant inbred strains of rodents, genetic correlational analysis and quantitative trait loci analysis are particularly useful, especially as genetic synteny between rodents and humans becomes better described. Also, because drug effects are highly labile to environmental conditions as well as genetic-based individual differences, multivariate, systems level studies should be developed to provide more complete descriptive and mechanistic views of a multifaceted problem.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)183-192
Number of pages10
JournalPharmacogenetics
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Pharmacogenetics
Cocaine
Individuality
Rodentia
Ethanol
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Synteny
Quantitative Trait Loci
Genetic Models
Toxicology
Molecular Biology
Animal Models
Genes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Genetics
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Pharmacogenetics of cocaine : A critical review. / Morse, Andrew C.; Erwin, V. Gene; Jones, Byron.

In: Pharmacogenetics, Vol. 5, No. 4, 01.01.1995, p. 183-192.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Morse, Andrew C. ; Erwin, V. Gene ; Jones, Byron. / Pharmacogenetics of cocaine : A critical review. In: Pharmacogenetics. 1995 ; Vol. 5, No. 4. pp. 183-192.
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