Pharmacokinetics of aminolevulinic acid after intravesical administration to dogs

James T. Dalton, Diansong Zhou, Arnab Mukherjee, David Young, Elizabeth Tolley, Allyn L. Golub, Marvin C. Meyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose. To examine the stability and systemic absorption of aminolevulinic acid (ALA) in dogs during intravesical administration. Methods. Nine dogs received an intravesical dose of ALA either with no prior treatment, after receiving ammonium chloride for urinary acidification, or after receiving sodium bicarbonate for urinary alkalinization. Urine and blood samples collected during and after administration were monitored for ALA using an HPLC assay developed in our laboratories. Concentrations of pyrazine 2,5-dipropionic acid, the major ALA degradation product, and radiolabeled inulin, a nonabsorbable marker for urine volume, were also determined. Results. Less than 0.6% of intravesical ALA doses was absorbed into plasma. Urine concentrations decreased to 37% of the initial concentration during the 2 hour instillation. Decreases in urinary ALA and radiolabeled inulin concentrations were significantly correlated, indicating that urine dilution accounted for over 80% of observed decreases in urinary ALA. ALA conversion to pyrazine 2,5-dipropionic acid was negligible. Conclusions. These studies demonstrate that ALA is stable and poorly absorbed into the systemic circulation during intravesical instillation. Future studies utilizing intravesical ALA for photodiagnosis of bladder cancer should include measures to restrict fluid intake as a means to limit dilution and maximize ALA concentrations during instillation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)288-295
Number of pages8
JournalPharmaceutical Research
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

Fingerprint

Intravesical Administration
Aminolevulinic Acid
Pharmacokinetics
Dogs
Urine
Pyrazines
Inulin
Dilution
Ammonium Chloride
Sodium Bicarbonate
Acids
Acidification
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms
Assays
Blood

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Dalton, J. T., Zhou, D., Mukherjee, A., Young, D., Tolley, E., Golub, A. L., & Meyer, M. C. (1999). Pharmacokinetics of aminolevulinic acid after intravesical administration to dogs. Pharmaceutical Research, 16(2), 288-295. https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1018840827910

Pharmacokinetics of aminolevulinic acid after intravesical administration to dogs. / Dalton, James T.; Zhou, Diansong; Mukherjee, Arnab; Young, David; Tolley, Elizabeth; Golub, Allyn L.; Meyer, Marvin C.

In: Pharmaceutical Research, Vol. 16, No. 2, 01.01.1999, p. 288-295.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dalton, JT, Zhou, D, Mukherjee, A, Young, D, Tolley, E, Golub, AL & Meyer, MC 1999, 'Pharmacokinetics of aminolevulinic acid after intravesical administration to dogs', Pharmaceutical Research, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 288-295. https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1018840827910
Dalton, James T. ; Zhou, Diansong ; Mukherjee, Arnab ; Young, David ; Tolley, Elizabeth ; Golub, Allyn L. ; Meyer, Marvin C. / Pharmacokinetics of aminolevulinic acid after intravesical administration to dogs. In: Pharmaceutical Research. 1999 ; Vol. 16, No. 2. pp. 288-295.
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